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Who gets your vote for Mayor of Toronto?

  • Ana Bailao

    Votes: 18 16.4%
  • Brad Bradford

    Votes: 3 2.7%
  • Olivia Chow

    Votes: 58 52.7%
  • Mitzie Hunter

    Votes: 2 1.8%
  • Josh Matlow

    Votes: 20 18.2%
  • Mark Saunders

    Votes: 4 3.6%
  • Other

    Votes: 5 4.5%

  • Total voters
    110
  • Poll closed .
I know term limits were discussed a little in the last election, but I hope it gets brought up in this by-election.

Has it ever been put to a vote before council?
We have discussed term limits here before and, though I am theoretically, in favour of them, the problem is that they remove both good and bad councillors and experience and 'history' is lost. The result is that City staff become more and more powerful as only they have the 'institutional memory' and ability to embark on plans that can be realised over more than one or two electoral cycles. Pam McConnell was a fantastic councillor who served many terms, as a School Trustee and then a councillor - without her long-range planning (and scheming) I doubt as many 'nice things' - e.g. Berczy and St James Parks, new North Market and the heritage lighting in St Lawrence would have been achieved. Then, of course you have the Holydays and the Mammolitis! The best solution would be to make it easier for an 'unknown' to attract votes and reduce the advantage sitting councillors (and MPPs and MPs) have. Then the voters could chose more fairly. How to achieve that? I am not sure.
 
Yes. I’m in favour of reducing incumbent advantages with measures like ranked ballots rather than hard term limits. A great councillor shouldn’t have to go after two or three terms, but it should be easier for them to be defeated too if they’re not doing their job.
 
We have discussed term limits here before and, though I am theoretically, in favour of them, the problem is that they remove both good and bad councillors and experience and 'history' is lost. The result is that City staff become more and more powerful as only they have the 'institutional memory' and ability to embark on plans that can be realised over more than one or two electoral cycles. Pam McConnell was a fantastic councillor who served many terms, as a School Trustee and then a councillor - without her long-range planning (and scheming) I doubt as many 'nice things' - e.g. Berczy and St James Parks, new North Market and the heritage lighting in St Lawrence would have been achieved. Then, of course you have the Holydays and the Mammolitis! The best solution would be to make it easier for an 'unknown' to attract votes and reduce the advantage sitting councillors (and MPPs and MPs) have. Then the voters could chose more fairly. How to achieve that? I am not sure.
3 terms would be 12 years, which should be more than enough to begin and start the execution of planning.
 
3 terms would be 12 years, which should be more than enough to begin and start the execution of planning.
Yes, and maybe enough for the person too - being a Councillor is a very busy and stressful job. However, if a councillor is 'good' I see no reason why they should not be able to offer themselves up for re-election and have this decision made by the voters.
 
“Frail older woman?” LOL. Nunziata is no Pam McConnell. She’s a mean, vindictive politician who has been in office since 1988.
And remember re my original McConnell reference point: there's a ton of difference btw/actually physically steamrollering an older person and simply voting against said older person. When it comes to speakerdom, seniority is not an immunity-granting honorific. If Nunziata earned a near-consensus vote, it's out of a certain complacency; plus, she's been relatively inoffensive in her role since John Tory became Mayor (as opposed to when she served under Rob Ford), so why upset the apple cart. Matlow's vote may have been lone-wolf gestural, but it at least expressed a valid "maybe we should consider someone else" argument--it's more thought out than the Dr. No scorched-earth contrarianism of Holyday.

Indeed, on those looking-outside-the-box grounds, Matlow *could* be fulfilling the Shawn Micallef "how the next mayor should be like Rob Ford" argument. (And if it were all about being kind to seniors with long elected histories, then Bob Chiarelli would have been returned as Ottawa's mayor and Bob Bratina as Hamilton's mayor last year.)
 
This "I know better than these other 25 people" and to not question it, or question the optics of it. Every other progressive on council voted in that way. Anyway, just how I saw it.
A vote for speaker isn't based on scientific data, sorry to say.
 

Former councillor Giorgio Mammoliti says he’s running to be Toronto's mayor

From link.

Former longtime councilor Giorgio Mammoliti says he’s running to be mayor of Toronto.

“I love the city so much and I just dreaded and hated to see it decline over the last few years,” Mammoliti told CP24 in an exclusive interview on “Live At Noon” Wednesday.

“I think we've lost a lot. We've lost our personality,” Mammoliti said. “I think our dignity is gone in a number of different ways. Our Street dignity – we're dirty.”
Mammoliti sat on Toronto City Council from 2000 until he was defeated at the ballot box in 2018. As a councillor, he was known for being outspoken and offering up a number of headline-grabbing suggestions over the years.

He said he wants to come back to run for mayor and “use my 30 years of experience to dramatically change things for the better.”

He said that would include “listening to families” and businesses.

“COVID has been a disaster for us for business. We haven't listened to the business owners. We've told them what's best for them,” he said.

He said he’d also like to work to increase the stock of affordable housing and to change drug policy in the city.

“We've chosen to watch people take drugs as opposed to saving their lives,” he said, referring to safe injection sites.

Prior to getting into local politics, Mammoliti served as an MPP in Ontario’s NDP government in the early 90s. He ran for mayor in 2010, but pulled out of the race before Election Day. In 2018 he said he planned to run as a PC candidate in Brampton Centre, but backed away from the idea a short time later.

More recently he ran to become mayor of Wasaga Beach last year, coming in third.

Mammoliti was no stranger to controversy during his years on council. He was docked three months pay by council in 2014 after the integrity commissioner found he broke the code of conduct in connection with a fundraising dinner in his honour.

He raised eyebrows by once suggested opening a red light district on the Toronto Islands and drew the ire of Parkdale residents in 2014 by referring to the neighbourhood as “a pedophile district.”

“Trust me, I know that some people have tried to challenge me over 30 years, integrity included,” Mammoliti told CP24 Thursday. “I'm still here. There's nothing wrong. I am here to lead. And trust me on this, I know that I can do the job and I know that I can change the policies to make everybody's life easier, including those people who can't afford to buy a home or an apartment or rent an apartment.”

The nomination period in the race to replace John Tory officially opens on April 3, but a slew of candidates have already said that they are either planning to run or exploring a possible bid.

They include MPP Mitzie Hunter and former police chief Mark Saunders. The list also includes many who are either on council or have council experience, including councillors Josh Matlow and Brad Bradford and former councillors Ana Bailao and Rob Davis.

Mammoliti said he plans to be at city hall to file his paperwork when nominations open April 3.
 
When is enough, enough for this clown of a buffoon Mammo.

He needs to just stay in Wasaga Beach and stay out of Toronto politics for good.
Be careful. The clown Rob Ford got in because of first-past-the-past ballots.
 

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