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I don't understand how Danielle Smith continues to virtue signal to her base (i.e. say the right things, but completely ignore them). How long do you think it will take for them to see through this trick.
 
Well, there was only one seat in Edmonton that was not NDP already, so it actually wouldn't have been possible to pick up more.

Yes, the rural areas stayed with UCP this time, but the longer term problem for the UCP is the growth in the province is mostly in the major cities and they did not do as well there this time.

I really don't think having a more social conservative and reactionary party will help the UCP in the next election.
They also won Sherwood Park
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They needed to sweep the ring in order to make up for their losses elsewhere. I cannot understand how the NDs didn't win Spruce Grove-Stony Plain, where they had an extremely strong and high-profile candidate and a weak UCP MLA.
No surprise whatsoever to me. I've met a ton of people from Spruce Grove/Stony Plain over the years while doing hard time workin' in Winterburn Industrial. Vast majority were pretty right leaning folks.

Parkland County as a whole has seen a major shift in demographics in the past number of years and is quickly becoming a pretty darn wealthy area. From 2015-2020 when Alberta was experiencing a fairly rough economic downturn after energy prices cratered, Parkland County's median income shot up 42%. I don't have any more recent data but I bet that number has continued to climb substantially. Wealthy rural areas typically go blue.
 
Does anyone know what the legal case might be for a lawsuit against the province for the renewables freeze? I mean there has to have been some companies and individuals planning to build solar and wind generator who got totally screwed over by it. It also seems like unlawful meddling in the economy by the government (which the UCP vehemently claims to be against).
 
Does anyone know what the legal case might be for a lawsuit against the province for the renewables freeze? I mean there has to have been some companies and individuals planning to build solar and wind generator who got totally screwed over by it. It also seems like unlawful meddling in the economy by the government (which the UCP vehemently claims to be against).
I'm sure they are already pursuing it. Will end up in litigation hell though, so probably more fruitful to just move your capital elsewhere. If and when the freeze lifts, don't be surprised to only see half the investment, if that, come back. In my opinion, the move was to reduce the investment footprint and slow down the sector from growing after the freeze is lifted.
 
Strange how little pushback there was from the party supporters considering the impacts to job creation and the economy. Almost like it's never been about those things, and just about blindly supporting the oil and gas industry no matter the costs
 
Oh it is going to be a mess, with everyone in AHS administration preoccupied with whether they keep their job or not, or if are going to get shuffled into something else. So even less attention will be paid to service delivery.

Yes, it will probably be a gold mine for consultants who imply magic results with just the right structure or number of bodies.

I suppose there are arguments for taking something like Mental Health and addictions out, but I wonder whether integration will suffer, as a lot of people with mental health and addictions often use acute and emergency care.
 
Probably going to need someone to ELI5 what is going on here and how this could actually improve outcomes. Why couldn't they have just created separate departments to focus on each thing rather than dissolving the organization entirely and coming up with four separate organizations? Am I missing something?

Like everyone else has said, this is a consultants dream.
 
APP survey: https://calgaryherald.com/news/politics/alberta-pension-plan-support-rises-unpopular-poll

NDP support rising provincially: poll​



Meanwhile, the Leger poll also tracked Alberta voter intentions, which indicate the NDP made gains during the fall, rising from 39 per cent support in September to 47 per cent in late October.

At the same time, support for the UCP fell slightly, from 49 per cent to 47 per cent.
Absolutely meaningless...the time for NDP support to rise was in May, not now, three and a half years out from the next election.
 

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