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i also found it interesting how many of that base that are opposed to “15 minute cities” actually live in one of the scores of “15 minute cities” scattered all around the province.
“I hate 15 minute cities!! They’re tyranny in disguise!!”

And you find out they live in Westlock where one end of the town and the other is 10 min lol
 
Do people actually think the Alberta NDP is a left-wing party?
In 2008 sure. Now? I’d suggest they’re on their way to becoming orange PC’s, especially as the party becomes more and more of a “big tent” organization similar to the PC’s post Klein.

It’s become more of a coalition of steadfast New Democrats, Alberta Liberals and the left wing of the PC’s. The only reason we haven’t seen a lot of inter party deadlock is Notley keeps a firm hand on party discipline.

Several of their candidates would be more at home with the PC’s if they still existed.
 
“I hate 15 minute cities!! They’re tyranny in disguise!!”

And you find out they live in Westlock where one end of the town and the other is 10 min lol

Speaking of Westlock:
 
In 2008 sure. Now? I’d suggest they’re on their way to becoming orange PC’s, especially as the party becomes more and more of a “big tent” organization similar to the PC’s post Klein.

It’s become more of a coalition of steadfast New Democrats, Alberta Liberals and the left wing of the PC’s. The only reason we haven’t seen a lot of inter party deadlock is Notley keeps a firm hand on party discipline.

Several of their candidates would be more at home with the PC’s if they still existed.
This echoes exactly what I have heard in door knocking campaigns. Lots of voters here only vote NDP because their candidates are very much what they'd expect from the PCs, on a provincial level.
At the same time, a lot of them vote CPC because their candidates ALSO fit the same bill.

That is the difference between the provincial and federal conservatives: the later are generally more moderate, centre-right/centre candidates, which is pretty much where the vast majority of Edmontonians sit. Even the federal Liberal candidates here have to lean towards the centre, in areas where the provincial NDP has a strong hold (Edmonton Centre, for example).
 
This echoes exactly what I have heard in door knocking campaigns. Lots of voters here only vote NDP because their candidates are very much what they'd expect from the PCs, on a provincial level.
At the same time, a lot of them vote CPC because their candidates ALSO fit the same bill.

That is the difference between the provincial and federal conservatives: the later are generally more moderate, centre-right/centre candidates, which is pretty much where the vast majority of Edmontonians sit. Even the federal Liberal candidates here have to lean towards the centre, in areas where the provincial NDP has a strong hold (Edmonton Centre, for example).
The provincial NDP still have really well done and organized campaigning skills. In a weird sense, they've slowly become the party of the educated professional/academia/precariat. And within the next few years, I'd argue the party of the urbanist. Brian Mason retiring was probably the last gasp of the party's union roots.

Federal Cons also still have an innate advantage in the city, due to vote splitting and essentially lack of focus from the Federal Liberals and the Federal NDP (until last election cycle). The Federal NDP have piggybacked off the provincial NDP and are steadily copying the provincial party when it comes to their campaigns in the city. It's why they got Edmonton-Griesbach. I'm fully expecting the Federal NDP to put more resources into the city in the next election. Edmonton-Centre or Edmonton-Manning might be in their sights.
 
The provincial NDP still have really well done and organized campaigning skills. In a weird sense, they've slowly become the party of the educated professional/academia/precariat. And within the next few years, I'd argue the party of the urbanist. Brian Mason retiring was probably the last gasp of the party's union roots.

Federal Cons also still have an innate advantage in the city, due to vote splitting and essentially lack of focus from the Federal Liberals and the Federal NDP (until last election cycle). The Federal NDP have piggybacked off the provincial NDP and are steadily copying the provincial party when it comes to their campaigns in the city. It's why they got Edmonton-Griesbach. I'm fully expecting the Federal NDP to put more resources into the city in the next election. Edmonton-Centre or Edmonton-Manning might be in their sights.

That is indeed the strategy

 
Alberta continues to be a laughingstock


And I don’t give a shit about what some people at a climate conference in DUBAI of all places are saying about us. We’re at least using our oil money to pay for livable wages and decent transit. What are they paying for? Giant oases in the middle of the desert built on the backs of slave labour?
 
And I don’t give a shit about what some people at a climate conference in DUBAI of all places are saying about us. We’re at least using our oil money to pay for livable wages and decent transit. What are they paying for? Giant oases in the middle of the desert built on the backs of slave labour?

Be nice if Alberta actually started reducing it's emissions. Suncor, among others, already announced they are increasing their production with support of Alberta government, which in turn pauses renewables.

From the story, "The Canada Energy Regulator says Alberta is the only province that emits more carbon than it did a decade ago. Canada’s overall greenhouse gas emissions between 2014 and 2021 decreased by about seven per cent while Alberta’s increased by 13 per cent.

Since 2005, Alberta’s emissions have increased by 49 megatonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent. That’s more than the 2021 emissions of all Atlantic Canada."
 
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I fear Alberta will be the Fossil of Day for a long time until we get rid of the UCP, they're constantly being counterproductive and putting even more of our eggs in the dying oil and gas basket. It's stunning how powerful the hold your nose and vote blue sentiment in Alberta is considering how consistently awful and dysfunctional they are and yet they still win elections.
 
Be nice if Alberta actually started reducing it's emissions. Suncor, among others, already announced they are increasing their production with support of Alberta government, which in turn pauses renewables.

From the story, "The Canada Energy Regulator says Alberta is the only province that emits more carbon than it did a decade ago. Canada’s overall greenhouse gas emissions between 2014 and 2021 decreased by about seven per cent while Alberta’s increased by 13 per cent.

Since 2005, Alberta’s emissions have increased by 49 megatonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent. That’s more than the 2021 emissions of all Atlantic Canada."
We don't have abundant hydro power, like most other big provinces and oilsands production, which is only in Alberta, has been expanding for many decades. Most of that production is exported, so emissions are made by consumers elsewhere. I'm not sure how that is reflected.

I do think the pause on renewables was a very bad idea, as parts of Alberta are quite good for solar and wind. Previously, there had been a lot of development of this. While we have little hydro, we have some advantage in this.
 
And I don’t give a shit about what some people at a climate conference in DUBAI of all places are saying about us. We’re at least using our oil money to pay for livable wages and decent transit. What are they paying for? Giant oases in the middle of the desert built on the backs of slave labour?
I doubt that these visitors to an international conference are using slaves to build desert oases.
 

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