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Excellent response Lis! I was surfing on-line to find something suitable, and I am disappointed by some of Kolb's suggestions, albeit the media has a habit of losing the context of remarks.

Water filled plastic barriers with fence on top look d0-able in lieu of "jersey barriers", but they all have serious drawbacks, and at the end of the day, something like the bottom pic above could be the answer, but not in metal. Make it something with give to it, like recycled plastic or rubber. I have a concern for cars hitting the the metal type seen above, and them becoming spears into oncoming cyclists. It's a very real risk w/o the cars being forced to stay that side of the curb.

I keep posting the following, and erasing it, been doing this all morning, but you and a few others in this string will relate to this. It's all too easy to point to the obvious (stark freakin' obvious) "accidents waiting to happen" like the stretches on Lakeshore....but if I go to that meeting on the Bloor Bike Lanes, which I find incredibly dangerous as well, God knows how I won't lose it with the 'do-gooders' touting how progressive they are in Toronto when it's nothing less than a frikkin joke how the Bloor Lanes have been designed, presented and compromised.

I'd best stop ranting now, I'm headed out to do some miles, and will do a bit on the Bloor Lanes just to see if anything ever changes...

Will continue search for apt barriers when I return. lol...if I return. Something of the nature shown above is very reasonable cost, and with more vertical posts, would most likely have prevented the 5 year-old's death. Meshing added to the above basic design might be enough to address retaining cyclists/pedestrians from falling into traffic. As to what prevents the traffic coming across into the cycle/pedestrian path is another matter...

Bear in mind that the stretch where the accident happened is very limited in width available for any form of barrier.
 
I must have missed the Del Duca podium for this, or did they skip it this time?

This time it was in a Canadian Tire basement.

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All hail Il Duce!

[The province has also created a cycling web-hub that will help people in Ontario find cycling information quickly and conveniently through a single portal.]
$50M is a spit in the bucket, but...that would be more than enough budget to publish a Rail Trail map of the Province with supporting dedicated trails, and perhaps on-road trails to connect them.

The fact that Ontario does not publish a collective trail map is beyond conscionable.
 
Update:
Today, though, the first day of Bike Month, the minister and his cabinet colleague, Eleanor McMahon, the Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport, visited Toronto to announce that Ontario is funding more cycling infrastructure across the province. The ministers launched the new Ontario Municipal Commuter Cycling Program (OCCP), investing $50 million dollars this year from its "carbon market" to support the program.
 
Assuming Toronto gets at least 5M of the new money, maybe, just maybe they can use this as an excuse to accomplish something in the cycling unit.

A few years back Adam Vaughan lost it, in public on the then head of the unit (who has since retired) because he couldn't grasp why it was taking so long to finish putting in bike lanes that were approved in his ward.

They haven't gotten any quicker.

Despite a generous budget, the proposal for new bike lanes this year is quite slim. (notably Woodbine and Lakeshore)

Its a bit better if you throw in the work tied to the Federal infrastructure funds.

But still. There's a lot of low-hanging fruit the City can't seem to get around to.

(ie. bike lanes in wards w/supportive councillor, on roads where you would have to do minimal alteration and where you might not even lose traffic lanes. )
 
My understanding is that the capital funding is sitting there without the appropriate operating funding to properly staff the department to implement it.

This year is apparently going to see a flurry of new bike installations, a lot of the stuff planned in for 2016 got deferred to this year which means there is supposed to be a ton of new stuff.
 
Bike lane installations without properly repairing the pavements and pot holes in this city show a serious lack of understanding of how bikes work.
Even the Bloor Lanes, touted as "the experiment on which other lanes will be based" has some very dangerous state of asphalt spots. The Bloor lanes are very dangerous as implemented, but for any cycle lanes, bad pavement is inviting serious accidents.
 
Even the Bloor Lanes, touted as "the experiment on which other lanes will be based" has some very dangerous state of asphalt spots. The Bloor lanes are very dangerous as implemented, but for any cycle lanes, bad pavement is inviting serious accidents.
The pavement is the worst going east between Bedford and Queens Park Crescent. I usually end up using the road there if there isn't traffic.
 
Bike lane installations without properly repairing the pavements and pot holes in this city show a serious lack of understanding of how bikes work.
I swear that if I hit one more pot hole with my car I will sure the city. Its only a matter of time before there will be an issue with my car
 

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