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mpd618

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Is there a timeframe on the new station? It was always such a pain getting off a train, and walking down to King Street.

I believe it is supposed to be open by the time the LRT is operating, which is supposed to be 2017 (and which could, IMO, be earlier).

Jeff Outhit figures 2015: http://www.therecord.com/news/local/article/644889--transit-hub-still-years-away
The Region doesnt really say anything beyond planning beginning this year... http://www.regionofwaterloo.ca/en/gettingAround/transithub.asp

There are two or three studies currently underway on various aspects of the King/Victoria station site. I believe it's likely to be a P3 and I'm going to guess the requirements will be set within about a year.

Edit: There's some more detail on the phasing and timeline of the project in this PDF.
 
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trainiart

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I saw a GO train standing on the Barrie line hwy 407 overpass yesterday around 10am. The cab car northbound headlights were on, leading me to assume it was on its way north. Other option of the train being parked there for the weekend was proven wrong when the train was no longer there half an hour later. Are they field testing the weekend schedule? But this time and place doesn't correspond to the announced schedule.
 
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EnviroTO

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Metrolinx proposed it. It was in The Big Move. Not anytime soon, but it was in there.

I never saw it in the maps so I had thought it wasn't in there but those maps were for the 15 and 25 year plans. I see Express Rail Cooksville to Union in 25 years but the possibility of direct to Mississauga City Centre beyond 25 years.
 

nfitz

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I never saw it in the maps so I had thought it wasn't in there but those maps were for the 15 and 25 year plans. I see Express Rail Cooksville to Union in 25 years but the possibility of direct to Mississauga City Centre beyond 25 years.
If Mississauga ever actually tried to push for transit, perhaps they'd get it sooner.
 

drum118

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If Mississauga ever actually tried to push for transit, perhaps they'd get it sooner.

They have been pushing the Hurontario LRT and it is being drag out by Metrolinx.

Metrolinx is only going to look at funding it when 30% of the construction drawings are done by 2014.

If there is no approval of funding for it in 2014, will not see it until the mid 20's or early 30's.

Bulk of the 2020 funding is being used up by GO Transit, that is going to carry a fraction of what local transit can carry at a lower cost. Between TTC, MT and HRS, they will carry 5:1 more riders than GO expansion.

Mississauga is putting various developments on the slow track until the LRT comes on line. Even cutting the size of them also.

There has been some talk that if Metrolinx does not fund the line by 2014, Mississauga may do it themselves and then back charge Metrolinx for the cost.

Hamilton is taken a step back on pushing their LRT these days for various reasons.
 

gweed123

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If Mississauga ever actually tried to push for transit, perhaps they'd get it sooner.

I would put it 3rd on the priority list for Mississauga. The BRT which is being built now is priority #1, then the Hurontario LRT, and then the spur.

If Mississauga pushed for it though, I could see the spur as being much more likely than a B-D extension.

They have been pushing the Hurontario LRT and it is being drag out by Metrolinx.

Metrolinx is only going to look at funding it when 30% of the construction drawings are done by 2014.

If there is no approval of funding for it in 2014, will not see it until the mid 20's or early 30's.

Bulk of the 2020 funding is being used up by GO Transit, that is going to carry a fraction of what local transit can carry at a lower cost. Between TTC, MT and HRS, they will carry 5:1 more riders than GO expansion.

Mississauga is putting various developments on the slow track until the LRT comes on line. Even cutting the size of them also.

There has been some talk that if Metrolinx does not fund the line by 2014, Mississauga may do it themselves and then back charge Metrolinx for the cost.

Hamilton is taken a step back on pushing their LRT these days for various reasons.

Is their any indication of what the funding % breakdown will be when/if the funding does come through? Will it be a Transit City type of deal (100% province), or will it be more of an Ottawa LRT type of deal?
 
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denfromoakvillemilton

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Tri-Rail expanding weekend service later this year

By Michael Turnbell, Sun Sentinel
May 8, 2012

Tri-Rail will increase its service on weekends and holidays, as high gas prices and frustration from road construction continue to lure more passengers.

By about Thanksgiving or Christmas, trains will run hourly on weekends and holidays instead of every two hours. Tri-Rail's operator said it needs about seven months to hire and train additional crew members to operate the trains.

It's Tri-Rail's first expansion of service since 2007, and officials credit a boost in demand, especially among those who ride the train to the region's three major airports.

In March, weekend ridership increased about 7 percent compared to the same month last year. On Saturday, Tri-Rail carried about 5,600 riders on 16 trains. The system averages 14,000 riders on weekdays, but they are spread over 50 trains.

"With passengers carrying a lot of luggage, and if there are a lot of bikes, the trains can get really crowded," said Tri-Rail spokeswoman Bonnie Arnold.

But weekend trains only run every two hours, which isn't considered frequent enough to lure people from driving.

Arnold said the new service will give people who work on the weekends more flexibility. "A lot of them take the train during the week but end up driving on the weekend because of the current schedule," she said.

Tri-Rail runs along a 72-mile corridor mostly west of Interstate 95, from Mangonia Park, just north of West Palm Beach, to Miami.

It doesn't stop directly at each airport, but drops riders at nearby stations where they can board shuttles to and from the airports. Airport shuttles also would be provided with the hourly service.

Last month, Tri-Rail began running special trains to serve fans attending Marlins homes games at night. But ridership has been poor, generally about 50 riders per game. The Marlins are paying for the service.

To get to the games, fans take Tri-Rail to the Metrorail Transfer Station in Hialeah, then switch to Metrorail and continue to Culmer Station in Overtown. From there, they take shuttles provided by Miami-Dade Transit to and from Marlins Park.

While the cost of gas is a major reason for Tri-Rail's growth, prices in South Florida have been slipping since late April, according to travel club AAA.

In Fort Lauderdale, it averaged $3.78 a gallon on Monday, down 18 cents from last year. In West Palm Beach, it was $3.81 a gallon, also off 18 cents.

But construction on I-95 in southern Broward County is just getting started, which also draws train passengers. Crews are adding express lanes in each direction between the Golden Glades interchange and Broward Boulevard in Fort Lauderdale. That work will continue until late 2014.

Tri-Rail's last expansion — running 50 trains on weekdays and 16 on weekends and holidays — was a result of a second track being added and a taller bridge being built over the South Fork of the New River in Fort Lauderdale.

mturnbell@tribune.com, 954-356-4155, 561-243-6550, Twitter @MikeTurnpike


This is MIAMI!!!. Places like Brampton, Milton, Bowmanville, etc deserve better. How come tri rail is doing this so fast and GO transit needs two years(at least)?
 

RedRocket191

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This is MIAMI!!!. Places like Brampton, Milton, Bowmanville, etc deserve better. How come tri rail is doing this so fast and GO transit needs two years(at least)?

In my experience, comparing X to Y is pointless. I'm sure there are fifty reasons why they can do it that fast but we can't. I'm trying to make excuses - I'm just saying that a superficial comparison isn't really worth much.
 

jwill

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To be fair, Tri-Rail is different from GO. It runs a single line down the middle of a linear region, with several mid-size downtowns along its route generating two-way demand, and not focused on any one destination (like Union). Many of the stations are located in, or near, commercial areas which makes it relatively easy to walk to shops, jobs, etc. Much easier than dealing with all the industrial wastelands surrounding the suburban GO stations.
 

mpd618

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Many of the stations are located in, or near, commercial areas which makes it relatively easy to walk to shops, jobs, etc. Much easier than dealing with all the industrial wastelands surrounding the suburban GO stations.

GO's Kitchener line now serves four downtowns. Of its 11 stations, at most 5 really are suburban. There is little reason to conceive of a line like this as a one-way weekday commuter service, yet that's what GO is doing.
 

nfitz

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There is little reason to conceive of a line like this as a one-way weekday commuter service, yet that's what GO is doing.
There's little other choice given much of it is single track with no signals, until extra track is added and the signals done. I can't remember the timeframe for this.
 

rbt

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This is MIAMI!!!. Places like Brampton, Milton, Bowmanville, etc deserve better. How come tri rail is doing this so fast and GO transit needs two years(at least)?

They don't mind running trains with an average load of 280 passengers despite and a much lower fare. Full 120km trip is $6.90, this is roughly equivalent to Union to Allandale on GO for $11.

http://www.tampabay.com/blogs/the-b...nns-state-union-talking-high-speed-rail-money
"Only one-sixth of the cost of operation is covered by the fares."


There is your answer. Tri-rail is nearly wholly funded by the state where GO is operations is almost entirely covered by the passenger.

GO carries 3 times the number of passengers on LakeShore West but still has less money for operations for LakeShore West than the TriRail line.


"The system averages 14,000 riders on weekdays, but they are spread over 50 trains"

TriRail averages 280 passengers per train. About a 15% load for a GO train.
 
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smallspy

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There were 5 VIA trains a day to Guelph at some point before Harris. Nothing to do with Harris though, it was the federal Conservatives who cut them.

That some point was before the cuts of 1990. 4 went on to London, while the fifth turned back at Stratford.

Dan
Toronto, Ont.
 

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