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Goldie

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Wooden sculpture of Tokyo-based Tadashi Kawamata on the site of the old Colonial Tavern on Yonge St. is raising eyebrows 1989 TPL
Wooden sculpture of Tokyo-based Tadashi Kawamata on the site of the old Colonial Tavern on Yon...jpg


Yonge N. of Queen.jpg
 

Marmaly

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Here we have the Bank of Nova Scotia and the Bank of Montreal. Located on the south side of Lawrence Ave. E., west of The Donway - in 1958 and 2020. The present Scotiabank building can be seen under construction in the 1958 photo (red circles in both photos). Interesting that the original buildings appear to be identical (mirror image), with an addition on the back of the BMO. Not true mirror image though as the window/door arrangement is the same on both. 1958 photo from TPL.

Bank of Montreal and the Bank of Nova Scotia branches, south side of Lawrence Avenue East, wes...png
 
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thecharioteer

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Here we have the Bank of Nova Scotia and the Bank of Montreal. Located on the south side of Lawrence Ave. E., west of The Donway - in 1958 and 2020. The present Scotiabank building can be seen under construction in the 1958 photo (red circles in both photos). Interesting that the original buildings appear to be identical (mirror image), with an addition on the back of the BMO. Not true mirror image though as the window/door arrangement is the same on both. 1958 photo from TPL.

View attachment 309981
Great comparison, Marmaly! both banks designed by John B. Parkin and "listed" on the Inventory of Heritage Properties. Unfortunately, renovations to the BMO building have not maintained the architectural integrity of the original.
 

Marmaly

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Great comparison, Marmaly! both banks designed by John B. Parkin and "listed" on the Inventory of Heritage Properties. Unfortunately, renovations to the BMO building have not maintained the architectural integrity of the original.
Thanks for your coimments thecharioteer. It's interesting that both banks went from the temporary buildings to new ones more than 20 times the size. Obviously much bigger than necessary, but appropriate to the financial excess of the industry.
 

LPCI

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Here we have the Bank of Nova Scotia and the Bank of Montreal. Located on the south side of Lawrence Ave. E., west of The Donway - in 1958 and 2020. The present Scotiabank building can be seen under construction in the 1958 photo (red circles in both photos). Interesting that the original buildings appear to be identical (mirror image), with an addition on the back of the BMO. Not true mirror image though as the window/door arrangement is the same on both. 1958 photo from TPL.

View attachment 309981
Interesting thesis about the development of Don Mills. I grew up there late 50’s.
 

raygo

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Hi seemsartless,

This isn't "Glen Castle", what it might be I can't be sure. There was an "Ansley Castle" at the corner of what is now Glengrove and Heather, on top of the low hill just east of the present day John Ross Robertson School.

If you can find a copy of Don Ritchie's "North Toronto" (Stoddart 1992) or a copy of "North Toronto in Pictures" (Toronto Public Library Local History Handbooks 1974). there are pictures of Ansley Castle. Time prevents making scans this evening.

From "North Toronto" page 88: "...the 'castle' had been built for Alfred Ansley, a successful manufacturer of hats..."

From "North Toronto in Pictures" page 19: "...the Ansleys built a substantial house of Portland cement at Heather street in 1909. When demolished in the early 1920s, the neighbours took pieces of it as souvenirs and used it for rockery in their gardens."

More on Glen Grove Park from "North Toronto in Pictures" page 19: "Pilgrims Farm [the name for the area before it became Glen Grove Park] was settled around the time of the War of 1812. James Beatty, a later owner, made it an 'occasional summer retreat' and renamed it 'Glen Grove'. Glen Grove Park was a popular place for Sunday School picnics and church garden parties in the 1890s.The open fields near Yonge street were used as a race course, a baseball diamond, an a cricket field."

I agree with your guess that your picture scene might be on the east side of Yonge - Blythwood Ravine. I could be wrong but I haven't been on Glengrove Avenue east in decades; it's a short no-exit street and I have no reason to be there but I don't think there is an extant house like that.

You have a nice website by the by. :)
I have developed an 82 minute presentation on the history of North Toronto (with stop and start pausing). It is self-narrating. I discuss this controversy of the mystery house shown in the picture. I believe it to be the old Beatty home. I welcome feedback at raymondgoodman2@gmail.com.
Enjoy the history. I have enjoyed your comments on this forum.
 

Goldie

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thecharioteer

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The above video "History of North York" by Raymond Goodman is magnificent! Take a look.
I've borrowed one of the images to present this pair of views of Yonge at Yorkville.
G. J. Frogley's Bakery 1890
View attachment 312213

Became the Cook Book Store in 1983 .....see history at: http://cookbookstoreblog.blogspot.com/2014/02/history-of-our-building-at-850-yonge-st.html
Current image indicates new structure:
View attachment 312214
The block is now "unwrapped" and looks pretty good!
 

Goldie

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thecharioteer: "The block is now "unwrapped" and looks pretty good!"
Goldie: "We need a photo!"
 

raygo

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I have developed an 82 minute presentation on the history of North Toronto (with stop and start pausing). It is self-narrating. I discuss this controversy of the mystery house shown in the picture. I believe it to be the old Beatty home. I welcome feedback at raymondgoodman2@gmail.com.
Enjoy the history. I have enjoyed your comments on this forum.
You won't be able to view this presentation anymore from the Youtube link. References to the North Toronto Historical Society exist, which were in anticipation of a future presentation to their membership. They have since requested that these references to them be removed from publicly available online links. Fair enough. So I will be crafting a new version which deletes these references, and it will take me some time to do so. In the meantime, thank you to everyone who viewed and commented on the project. It was a privilege to research and share stories relating to our common local history.
 

Blovertis

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The above video "History of North York" by Raymond Goodman is magnificent! Take a look.
I've borrowed one of the images to present this pair of views of Yonge at Yorkville.
G. J. Frogley's Bakery 1890
View attachment 312213

Became the Cook Book Store in 1983 .....see history at: http://cookbookstoreblog.blogspot.com/2014/02/history-of-our-building-at-850-yonge-st.html
Current image indicates new structure:
View attachment 312214
By the way, Frogley's Bakery was where one George Weston did his apprenticeship. By coincidence, his grandson Galen died yesterday.
 

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