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IanO

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The River Valley Planning Modernization Project will renew our strategic planning for the River Valley and the processes and tools for evaluating and regulating development that is proposed within the system.

 
It would be critical to understand how areas will be classified as "Preservation" not allowing anything but foot traffic. If the maps in pages 63 and 64 are final they are considering the area above the pipeline, former coal mines, grassy areas and foreign species forest as preservation. I don't understand the logic or the criteria used to land on that. Maybe it's buried in the other 175 pages but even if I find it and understand it, I will probably not agree.

I don't understand this passive aggression towards mountain biking, the bike trail building business is booming around the world as it seems mountain biking is popular among educated high income people. I thought that's the type of person the city wants to attract.
 
I'm sorta torn on this idea. I want our river valley to get the support, increased funding and recognition it deserves, however I'm a little uneasy about any unintended consequences that may arise from added regulations and restrictions this would bring.

The devil is in the details, and I'd like to know more before I say yay or nay
 
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there are signed partnership agreements with three municipalities already: saskatoon, halifax and winnipeg. in addition to edmonton area, colloid, bc, windsor, ont., and montreal are also being considered.

if the impact is anything like the national capital commission has made to ottawa and hull we should be pushing for this for all it’s worth.

i can just imagine the uproar if federal funds flowed to montreal for this and excluded us even if - again - it was of our foolish choosing.
 
there are signed partnership agreements with three municipalities already: saskatoon, halifax and winnipeg. in addition to edmonton area, colloid, bc, windsor, ont., and montreal are also being considered.

if the impact is anything like the national capital commission has made to ottawa and hull we should be pushing for this for all it’s worth.

i can just imagine the uproar if federal funds flowed to montreal for this and excluded us even if - again - it was of our foolish choosing.
I agree with you completely. I'm all for things like the Touch the Water initiative, but they aren't blocked by such an arrangement if it's done right. The way I see it is in the grand scheme of things, it's better to be a bit too restrictive at first instead of being too lenient by passing up this opportunity. Regulations can be changed within the cycle of a government, but nature takes much longer to recover (IE mature trees); and that's assuming whatever gets developed in the river valley ever gets removed in the first place. Large-scale initiatives will always have unknown variables that can cause fear and doubts, but it would ill behoove us to refuse to even come to the table with the feds to try and work something out.
 
I get the hesitation since we have few details, but it seems like a case of cutting off your nose to spite your face by rejecting the proposal before knowing how it would work. If the feds want to pay for better signage, infrastructure projects like the Mill Creek daylighting, improved maintenance and staffing, etc., I would be inclined to take it as long as we don't have to give up too much control.

The devil's in the details, but the river valley is a gem and I would be thrilled to have its status elevated to a national park.
 

Edmonton Mountain Bike Alliance (EMBA) is working to develop a mountain bike skills park. This park will be open to the public and located in central Edmonton’s Queen Elizabeth Park on the site of the former Wastewater Treatment Plant. It will provide a dedicated space for people to learn and practice mountain bike skills, and will include skill-building features and singletrack trails.

Community interest in such a facility, as well as its location and size, were confirmed through a master planning process for Queen Elizabeth Park. City Council approved the Master Plan for the area in 2013.
 

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