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How about instead of lines and flex posts they actually construct bump outs? 😆

In a perfect world, yes…. But for the price of a single curb build-out, they can probably do the drawings and painting for 20 intersections, so as an expedited city wide program I’m all for the paint and fender version for now.
Messing with curbs may mean sewer grating and culvert changes. I can see why this only happens during roadwork.

- Paul
 
In a perfect world, yes…. But for the price of a single curb build-out, they can probably do the drawings and painting for 20 intersections, so as an expedited city wide program I’m all for the paint and fender version for now.
Messing with curbs may mean sewer grating and culvert changes. I can see why this only happens during roadwork.

- Paul
They could leave the sewer grates where they are, but put in stormwater gardens. Except the garden will likely be mowed down by the city, thinking they are weeds.

5036625486_e60cef8f76_b.jpg
From link.
 
They could leave the sewer grates where they are, but put in stormwater gardens. Except the garden will likely be mowed down by the city, thinking they are weeds.

5036625486_e60cef8f76_b.jpg
From link.

You know Walter, its get really tiring seeing you bash the City endlessly.

The City of Toronto literally built something just like this, this year at Danforth and Kelvin, and you know that, cause you saw that in this very thread.

Its fair to critique the City's pace of such investments, and whether we might have hoped to see such initiatives in greater numbers some years ago. But to suggest the City cannot or does not do this, when you know better........

Ummm, not a good look there.

Refresher: https://urbantoronto.ca/forum/threads/road-safety-vision-zero-plan.26636/post-1959263
 
Toronto's Vision Zero strategy is moving in the right direction, say advocates and experts, but it has yet to meet its goal of ending traffic fatalities and serious injuries on city roads.

So far this year, 25 people have died on Toronto's roadways, the latest data from the city shows. That number includes 15 pedestrians, six motorists, three motorcyclists and one cyclist. In all of 2022, 50 people died in road incidents, approximately 30 killed by the middle of the year.

"The term for the project is Vision Zero. And really, the goal is to get to zero fatalities and much lower serious injuries," said Matti Siemiatycki, the director of the Infrastructure Institute at the University of Toronto. "We're not there yet."

The City of Toronto introduced its Vision Zero strategy in 2016 with the goal of reducing traffic-related deaths and serious injuries to zero after 78 people died in traffic incidents the previous year.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/25-deaths-roads-summer-2023-1.6924186
 
The fact that the state strives to do something useful is commendable. But the real zero is impossible, no matter how much we all would like
Vision Zero remains a vision to strive for zero pedestrian fatalities. Any reduction in deaths and injuries is a successful step towards that goal. While statistically, zero is highly improbable for many things. Zero pedestrian fatalities is possible: https://www.planetizen.com/news/2022/12/120621-jersey-city-vision-zero-success-story.
 
Toronto's Vision Zero strategy is moving in the right direction, say advocates and experts, but it has yet to meet its goal of ending traffic fatalities and serious injuries on city roads.

So far this year, 25 people have died on Toronto's roadways, the latest data from the city shows. That number includes 15 pedestrians, six motorists, three motorcyclists and one cyclist. In all of 2022, 50 people died in road incidents, approximately 30 killed by the middle of the year.

"The term for the project is Vision Zero. And really, the goal is to get to zero fatalities and much lower serious injuries," said Matti Siemiatycki, the director of the Infrastructure Institute at the University of Toronto. "We're not there yet."

The City of Toronto introduced its Vision Zero strategy in 2016 with the goal of reducing traffic-related deaths and serious injuries to zero after 78 people died in traffic incidents the previous year.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/25-deaths-roads-summer-2023-1.6924186

Lets look at what the numbers show year by year to see progress (or lack thereof)

1691593723230.png



Note that in the current year, if you simply extrapolate based on continuing the fatality rate to year end, we will end the year at ~43 fatalities. That would be down from 50 last year.

2020 was peak-pandemic and has to be treated as an outlier accordingly.

Elsewise we do see a positive trendline, fairly modest through 2019, but picking up steam post 2021.
 
They could leave the sewer grates where they are, but put in stormwater gardens. Except the garden will likely be mowed down by the city, thinking they are weeds.

5036625486_e60cef8f76_b.jpg
From link.
Walter: PLEASE stop these constant gripes - the City is certainly not perfect but they are NOT plotting against you. You often post useful and informative posts but ......
 
The redesign of the Dundas and The Kingsway intersection

They put in a raised crossing. However, they used a stop sign, which is ignored by most of the motorists. If there is a raised crossing, use a yield sign. They have "sharks' teeth" pavement markings, but pointing in the opposite direction. And of course a stop line. :eek:
 

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