News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 02, 2020
 5.8K     0 
News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 01, 2020
 29K     0 
News   GLOBAL  |  Apr 01, 2020
 2.8K     0 

evandyk

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
May 22, 2019
Messages
1,531
Reaction score
5,353
The last two years have been pretty hard on this neighbourhood. Even before the pandemic, it had a lot of people with marginal housing, depending on social services. The pandemic has obviously hurt a lot of people in both of those situations, and then we have added a bunch of temporary shelters.

It will bounce back eventually, but there are a lot of problems right now. Just yesterday, my wife stepped out of our place with the toddler to head to daycare and there was a bunch of used needles scattered around the doorway. I have no animosity to people who are living on the streets in difficult situations around here, but the City (and province/feds) could do so much more to help. There are a bunch of organizations who provide housing that could step in if only there was funding.
 

dusk

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jul 15, 2015
Messages
226
Reaction score
502
Genuine question, is there a reason other neighbourhood cannot pick up the slack? This area is slammed with shelters as it is. I read through the material above and it seems very wishy washy.
 

DSC

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
Jan 13, 2008
Messages
15,270
Reaction score
15,538
City:
Toronto
Auditor General's work-plan for 2022
1635263011251.png

This MAY throw some light on the Wellington fiasco!
 

CityPainter

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 20, 2010
Messages
386
Reaction score
151
This is a touch outside the St. Lawrence Market area and into Corktown, but it's part of the same project as the Esplanade reconstruction recently discussed, so I hope it's ok post it here. The bike lane now extends along Mill St from Parliament St to Cherry St, and here they have included planters to help separate the bikes from the cars. They are also in the midst of building a curb cut where the Parliament Square park path meets Parliament Street, which will lead the bikes directly through the middle of the intersection into the bike lane, rather that through the crosswalks.

mill-bikelanes-1.jpg


mill-bikelanes-2.jpg


I'm not sure when the separate path for bikes will be added through the park -- I hope the Ontario Line work does not interfere with that plan, because even though I'm in support of these bike lanes I have some apprehension about more cyclists speeding through the park on the current path that is shared with pedestrians.
 

DSC

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
Jan 13, 2008
Messages
15,270
Reaction score
15,538
City:
Toronto
This is a touch outside the St. Lawrence Market area and into Corktown, but it's part of the same project as the Esplanade reconstruction recently discussed, so I hope it's ok post it here. The bike lane now extends along Mill St from Parliament St to Cherry St, and here they have included planters to help separate the bikes from the cars. They are also in the midst of building a curb cut where the Parliament Square park path meets Parliament Street, which will lead the bikes directly through the middle of the intersection into the bike lane, rather that through the crosswalks.

View attachment 358955

View attachment 358956

I'm not sure when the separate path for bikes will be added through the park -- I hope the Ontario Line work does not interfere with that plan, because even though I'm in support of these bike lanes I have some apprehension about more cyclists speeding through the park on the current path that is shared with pedestrians.
There are more pics on the Bike Lanes page https://urbantoronto.ca/forum/threa...s-headed-downtown.15478/page-236#post-1750950

The path through Parliament Sq Park will be redone in 2022. Pedestrians will use current one and cyclists will have a new separate one running through southern part of what is now the Green P lot. That MAY be what all the roadwork in your photo is preparing for.
 

DSC

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
Jan 13, 2008
Messages
15,270
Reaction score
15,538
City:
Toronto
At Council in July a motion from Wong-Tam was passed asking Staff to report next week on the City's streetlighting contract with Toronto Hydro Street Lighting and on 'decorative lighting'. Predictably, there is no report.
See:

Shining a Light on Toronto Hydro by Updating Street Lighting Options
http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2021.IE23.21

Of course, Matt Elliott reports that as of August there were 393 overdue Reports to Council.

See: https://www.thestar.com/opinion/con...-delays-and-reduced-service-at-city-hall.html
Wong-Tam's office tells me that this report is now promised in December. We shall see!
 

DOWNTOWNTO27

New Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
32
Reaction score
11
Attached is the actual notice that was sent out to some addresses nearby. Pretty disappointing to see the proposed rendering. Appears to be some sort of cladding to go over the limestone. Agreed that this area (of which I too live in) is getting pretty slammed with shelters, drug paraphernalia, disturbed individuals. This is purely anecdotal but since Covid hit, there has been a huge increase in ambulances and police vehicles that always seem to be driving at very high speeds looking for someone/something. The neighborhood does not seem to be heading in the right direction. It also looks like the City wants to extend those shelter hotels.




The City have just announced a public meeting to discuss their (firm, it appears) plan to open an Indigenous Men's Shelter at 67 Adelaide St E. (Corner of Church) in 2024. It will replace the Women's Drop-in Centre that has been there for some years. .(This is a few yards from the recently opened men's shelter at 76 Church Street, in the former back-packers hostel). SEE; https://www.toronto.ca/community-pe...lacement-expansion-projects/67-adelaide-st-e/ and https://www.toronto.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/9794-Final76-ChurchPublicEventPresentationAODA.pdf

Though I support shelters it does seem that this part of St Lawrence is seeing more than its fair share as it is not far from the Novotel on The Esplanade and the Salvation Army hostel on Jarvis at Adelaide. Interestingly, a familiar face is the coordinator of the "public consultation" Joe Mihevc, Community Engagement Facilitator

Screen Shot 2021-11-01 at 2.42.47 PM.png
 

EddyMCD

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Dec 30, 2011
Messages
132
Reaction score
138
Why do the local councilors not fight against these types of projects in the SLM like they would in other areas of the City? The east end of downtown already houses a disproportionate share of social services compared to other areas in the City. They need to spread things out.
 

evandyk

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
May 22, 2019
Messages
1,531
Reaction score
5,353
The local councillors support setting up the shelters because without them, people are living on the streets of the ward without services. Our neighbourhoods can't force other parts of the city to support people in need, but on a short term basis, having shelters in St. Lawrence is better than not having them.
 

DOWNTOWNTO27

New Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
32
Reaction score
11
The local councillors support setting up the shelters because without them, people are living on the streets of the ward without services. Our neighbourhoods can't force other parts of the city to support people in need, but on a short term basis, having shelters in St. Lawrence is better than not having them.
The City could and should do a better job of spreading them out. The St. Lawrence neighbourhood is disproportionately heavy on shelters and the current situation is upsetting a lot of residents.
 

evandyk

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
May 22, 2019
Messages
1,531
Reaction score
5,353
Yes, the City could and should, but the question was why the local councillors don't fight them.
 

dusk

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jul 15, 2015
Messages
226
Reaction score
502
Absolutely tired of what the neighbourhood has become. In the last five years it went from quite tolerable to intolerable.
 

Top