AHK

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August 16, 2022.

A photo of the east side facade of 629 King Street West building showing the impact of aging on the similar / same type of material being used on 357 King Street West. The extent of the rippling or 'oil canning' seems to vary, at times it appears to be worse than can be seen below - suspect it may change with temperature causing different rates of expansion or contraction.

A cautionary tale for use of this type of material.

20220816_105859.jpg
 

Bjays92

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This building screams infill and honestly as far as dense big city infill goes, I like it. The problem is it's right on the corner, as opposed to just sandwhiched down the road somewhere.
 

old boy

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This building screams infill and honestly as far as dense big city infill goes, I like it. The problem is it's right on the corner, as opposed to just sandwhiched down the road somewhere.
Maybe 'infill' isn't the best label anymore.
 

UtakataNoAnnex

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You know, this suggests that not only developers have a real aversion to colour...but when they do show it, they do their best to obscure it as it's an embarrassing thing. /sigh
 

daptive

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You know, this suggests that not only developers have a real aversion to colour...but when they do show it, they do their best to obscure it as it's an embarrassing thing. /sigh
Somewhere in the last 10 years colour has just been deemed by the general cultural public as unfashionable, not luxurious, or— ironically—cheap.

I think Toronto condo boom just happened to line up with this philosophy.

The world in general is ‘losing colour’ from the clothes we wear to the cars we drive. I’m hoping this is just another pendulum swing and we’ll see the opposite be true in the next few decades.
 

UtakataNoAnnex

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Somewhere in the last 10 years colour has just been deemed by the general cultural public as unfashionable, not luxurious, or— ironically—cheap.

I think Toronto condo boom just happened to line up with this philosophy.

The world in general is ‘losing colour’ from the clothes we wear to the cars we drive. I’m hoping this is just another pendulum swing and we’ll see the opposite be true in the next few decades.
I mean sure...though I tend to also lean towards ProjectEnd-san's theory that grey is simply cheaper. That's why we're seeing used everywhere! >.<
 

limer

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I mean sure...though I tend to also lean towards ProjectEnd-san's theory that grey is simply cheaper. That's why we're seeing used everywhere! >.<

why not both?

I'm probably projecting, but if art imitates life (in the current social climate), then it makes sense we are getting architecture that strives to be inoffensive, flat, clean/sterile, detached from context, and above all economical (ie grey).
 

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