I saw @soundmuseum's photos in the Eaton Centre retail thread, and was surprised to see the Nordstrom entrance at the end of a narrow hallway. Figured the hoarding gave a misleading impression. But here is the graphic Uniqlo is using on its website. CF has just done a fantastic job with the design of the Dundas Atrium - top notch.

uniqlo.png
 

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Yeah, I don't understand why Nordstrom just don't care: they could have told CadFair "double height hallway for our entrance or forget it", but neither they nor CadFair cared enough. That's distressing.

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Does it really surprise you? They have a whole massive wall (More than double height) to showcase their brand on the other side of the mall and chose to create a tiny, off-centred entrance on that end too.
 
Great coffee table book idea for someone: The slow desecration of Toronto's commercial palaces. Here's the opening paragraph:

"Too often we think about destruction as an absolute term. We lament the loss of Yonge Street's gilded arcade for a banal building that now houses a passport office and a GoodLife. But Toronto's most elegant temples of commerce still stand; however, unlike a Grey Gardens or Satis House, these temples aren't simply languishing awaiting a fresh coat of paint. Their fate is much worse - they have slowly been victimized by supposed modernity which we've let pick away at their representation of Fin De Siecle commercialism. Uptown Yorkdale's mid-century modernity and googie flourishes were slowly destroyed by a white-wash of well.. taupe. In the west-end Sherway Gardens, which was once pock-marked with actual gardens, has proven that not all gardens need to be watered down in order to flourish. And Downtown - where the good burghers of the Eaton clan blessed their city with a modern take on an old school arcade complete with futuristic flourishes - let their progeny slowly deface a classical building into a hodge podge of permutations with a face that not even its mother could love. This death by a thousand cuts is perhaps worse than simple destruction, instead of something entirely new, we're left with a freak show of things passed."
 
Does it really surprise you? They have a whole massive wall (More than double height) to showcase their brand on the other side of the mall and chose to create a tiny, off-centred entrance on that end too.

Maybe they want the Yonge Street entrance to be the main store entrance.
 
Looks like the media screen is now at full height, I think it's the same as the last photo posted but there's a white frame along the top edge now that seems to cap it off.
 
And neglect the massive frontage they have into the galleria portion of the mall? Whatever their reason, it's a poor design choice.

Yup, it is a bit odd.
Come to think of it, the Vancouver store (Pacific Centre) has no appreciable mall presence at all.
The mall level of Sears/Eatons was converted to retail and there's only a small sign to elevators leading up to Nordstrom (even the former escalator atrium was covered over). Otherwise there's one vestibule entrance shared with the mall (Robson & Granville corner) and the other entrances are all to street (but there is good street presence (until redevelopment of the plaza out front).
 

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