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Mercenary

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ShonTron

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Not surprising! Pearson airport tops list of world's worst delays this summer.


That was a really good article.

For those who aren’t able or aren’t willing to read the whole thing, though there’s lots of blame to go around, it’s Air Canada that’s the worst culprit. Some of the reasons are cited above: AC is scheduling flights without the staff to service and fly them. It will blame the weather to get out of compensation.

And it’s focus on Sixth Freedom travel between intercontinental flights and US destinations (especially secondary airports) has helped to jam the US and Canadian customs halls as so many of the AC transborder flights leave and arrive at Pearson at the same time.

A second major problem is that airport workers laid off from their jobs at Pearson quickly found work in nearby logistics centres with the jump in online retail. They haven’t gone back to the airport.

Yes, the federal COVID restrictions and travellers, especially those unfamiliar or rusty at airport procedures are an issue. But AC and general staffing are the top issues affecting Pearson especially hard.
 

Mercenary

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That was a really good article.

For those who aren’t able or aren’t willing to read the whole thing, though there’s lots of blame to go around, it’s Air Canada that’s the worst culprit. Some of the reasons are cited above: AC is scheduling flights without the staff to service and fly them. It will blame the weather to get out of compensation.

And it’s focus on Sixth Freedom travel between intercontinental flights and US destinations (especially secondary airports) has helped to jam the US and Canadian customs halls as so many of the AC transborder flights leave and arrive at Pearson at the same time.

A second major problem is that airport workers laid off from their jobs at Pearson quickly found work in nearby logistics centres with the jump in online retail. They haven’t gone back to the airport.

Yes, the federal COVID restrictions and travellers, especially those unfamiliar or rusty at airport procedures are an issue. But AC and general staffing are the top issues affecting Pearson especially hard.
Thanks for the Summary. This is exactly the reason why monopolies abuse their power.

Rogers is another one

Canada needs more competition. We pay the highest rates in the world for airfare, mobile, etc. And yet get the shoddiest services.
 

Voltz

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That was a really good article.

For those who aren’t able or aren’t willing to read the whole thing, though there’s lots of blame to go around, it’s Air Canada that’s the worst culprit. Some of the reasons are cited above: AC is scheduling flights without the staff to service and fly them. It will blame the weather to get out of compensation.

And it’s focus on Sixth Freedom travel between intercontinental flights and US destinations (especially secondary airports) has helped to jam the US and Canadian customs halls as so many of the AC transborder flights leave and arrive at Pearson at the same time.

A second major problem is that airport workers laid off from their jobs at Pearson quickly found work in nearby logistics centres with the jump in online retail. They haven’t gone back to the airport.

Yes, the federal COVID restrictions and travellers, especially those unfamiliar or rusty at airport procedures are an issue. But AC and general staffing are the top issues affecting Pearson especially hard.
But the Sun tells me it's all the Governments fault..
 

crs1026

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Can AC explain how random COVID tests to arriving passengers causes delays in offloading baggage, when the testing only happens after people have collected their bags and are leaving the baggage hall ?
Can AC explain how random COVID tests to arriving passengers causes lineups and delays for passengers on the departing level and in security ?

I’m sure Ottawa isn’t blameless, but seems like there is a lot of buck passing to me.

- Paul
 

Amare

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Thanks for the Summary. This is exactly the reason why monopolies abuse their power.

Rogers is another one

Canada needs more competition. We pay the highest rates in the world for airfare, mobile, etc. And yet get the shoddiest services.
But yet the government does everything to virtually allow consolidation to happen across industries. Let's not forget, the Canadian government was going to allow Air Canada acquire Air Transat, but it was the European Commission who refused it. WestJet has acquired Sunwing, but the government gave their blessings by allowing it. They speak out of their #**$ on one side, but it's a whole different ball game on the other side.

We have new forms of competition with LCC at the moment, but just wait until consolidation happens there. I guarantee you that in some point in the future, Air Canada, WestJet, and possibly even Porter will end up acquiring Canada Jetlines, Lynx Air, and Flair Airlines. Then we'll be right back to where we were.
 

Admiral Beez

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That was a really good article.

For those who aren’t able or aren’t willing to read the whole thing, though there’s lots of blame to go around, it’s Air Canada that’s the worst culprit. Some of the reasons are cited above: AC is scheduling flights without the staff to service and fly them. It will blame the weather to get out of compensation.

And it’s focus on Sixth Freedom travel between intercontinental flights and US destinations (especially secondary airports) has helped to jam the US and Canadian customs halls as so many of the AC transborder flights leave and arrive at Pearson at the same time.

A second major problem is that airport workers laid off from their jobs at Pearson quickly found work in nearby logistics centres with the jump in online retail. They haven’t gone back to the airport.

Yes, the federal COVID restrictions and travellers, especially those unfamiliar or rusty at airport procedures are an issue. But AC and general staffing are the top issues affecting Pearson especially hard.
Yesterday I flew SAS from Copenhagen to Toronto T1. I had fears of huge delays and lost luggage, but it was no issue at all. First of all, the plane made straight to the runway, no circling due to crowded tarmac, then straight to the terminal. No real delay deplaning, but the captain said the airport asked that we deplane half the passengers and then wait about five mins to send the rest. As we left the plane but before we descended to the customs hall a security official guided us to a separate room with about two dozen of the declaration terminals. We waited perhaps five mins for a free one. Once we had the printed form we entered the customs hall, which was very crowded but not hugely so. An official saw that we’d already got our declaration slip and directed us down a different line that had us in front of and past the customs officer within ten mins. Then a short walk to the mostly empty luggage hall, with none of the mountains of lost luggage the media suggested I’d see. And my checked luggage was already beside the carousel, so out we went to the UPE to Union and then home on Uber. In short, it was one of my best high season Pearson T1 experiences. Either the airport has resolved many of the issues or I got lucky.
SAS just filed for bankruptcy recently...
No issues for us. And SAS seems a lovely airline. Wide and roomy economy seats, and good food and video entertainment. A new, fast, and from my experience the smallest transatlantic aircraft ever. We did suffer plenty of screaming youngsters - motorcycle earplugs saved the day.

I still believe most of the issues could be avoided by not flying to the US and avoiding Air Canada and ideally flying out of T3. If I was flying to the US I’d drive to Buffalo airport (or take Amtrak there from Toronto, with short cab ride) and fly from there.
 
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Streety McCarface

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Three weeks ago I had a similar good experience at Pearson, getting off a full A330 from LA, with like 4 other wide-body international red eyes (2 from India, one from London, and I believe one from SFO). Once I got off the plane, there was no issue getting to a machine (but those stupid things can't read my PR card, so I had to wait for an agent). Had one in 3 minutes, got my stamp, and was out of there (with no mountains of luggage mind you). All in all, maybe a 10-15 minute experience from gate to the bus stop.

Side note, the express moving walkways have been covered. Anyone know what's up with those?
 

Streety McCarface

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How does that work? They send them to D, and then those passenger pretend they have an international "connection" and head to E?
There's a corridor post D security that allows travelers to head to the E gates. It's a one way corridor though, so you can't go through E security to access D gates.
They have ways for people to get from different sections of the airport past security like for example at terminal 3 they have gates that are both for Us and domestic departures they just close off part of the area when they need to move people around.
You're thinking of Swing gates, T1 has like 20 of those, and those are a little different.
I was impressed by the overhead luggage capacity on Air Canada's 787s. I had a couple of full flights to/from Vancouver recently, most people had carry-on, and many of the overheads had excess space!
787s, 737 MAX's, and the 777's have been a godsend on Air Canada. So much luggage space, even on a full flight. I'll take a reduction in 1/4" of seat width if it means I'm guaranteed bin space for my carry on and personal item every time and therefore get room under the seat in front of me to stretch my legs.

The A320's and A321's, my god what a nightmare. Not once have I not been delayed at least an hour as a result of there not being enough bin space.

The C-Series I've honestly found to be a mixed bag. With some carry ons you can fit them on their side, other times you have to lay them flat. Honestly the options are not great there.

The A330s...flew on one for the first time 3 weeks ago, hands down the worst aircraft in the AC fleet. Horrible overhead bins (it's even difficult to fit regular carry ons in there), it was insanely noisy, and my god, no air vents. Also, for some reason, the mood lighting on those planes seems to fit more in line with a caramelldansen meme than with relaxing mood lighting. I lost an hour of sleep on that flight simply because of that. Next time I'll be taking a 787.
 

drum118

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Our trip to Europe and back was a mix bag.

Will never fly Air Transit again, especially the Dreamliner. 3 + 3/4 + 3 rows with no leg room to the point you had to slide in/out of your seat for the 2 and window seat. The A321 gave you leg room coming home. SAS had a lot of leg room.

The biggest issue at Pearson standing in line to check in only to have to stand in another line since there was no gate and the plane was arriving 45 minutes late to get our tickets. Going through screening was short and fast after they test the cameras and laptop. Almost an hour late departing Pearson.

Rome was fast going through custom where you had to scan your passport and photo taken to get through the gate to custom. Custom only look at the passport, stamp and wave us on.

Flying SAS from Milano to Stockholm out of the city terminal was fast with very little time for screening.

Flying from Brussels to Montreal was a pain starting where Air Transit check in was to getting in the wrong line to have our passport check and stamp to leave Europe. Regardless what line you were in to get your passport check and photo check, it was over an hour wait. Screening was real backup to about 30 minute wait and slow going. Had to do my cameras and laptop testing 3 times for unknown reason.

Our flight had to go to Montreal with a 4 hour layover as well changing planes. Planes were 30 minute late departing both Brussels and Montreal.

Was a breeze in Montreal doing custom fill out considering I had already done it on line as well scanning the passport and photo taken. Took less than 2 minutes to clear custom. The walk from one terminal to the other was a pain.

We left T3 on the southside and arrived at a new north terminal that I never knew of considering I rarely follow this thread nor been up at the airport in sometime. That one long walk to get your luggage as well getting some good shots of the airport and planes. 4 long moving walkways.

Based on the airports we saw in Europe, Pearson rank low with Montreal being at the bottom. Brussels would rank 2nd lowest and no idea where to place Rome since I didn't see much of it. Milano would be the 3rd lowest. Zurich, Hamburger, Frankfurt, Copenhagen and Pearson would be my ranking of others.

Hamburger would be #2 just for plane watching with Frankfurt being #1. Disappointed with Frankfurt this time as have the observation deck close due to construction on the terminal, but most of lost of photographing and video shooting. There was a railing system before that has been replace by a 10-12' mesh fence that had only a few openings to shoot. Traffic was very light from what I saw in the past, but caught a few 380's.

Pearson could take a few things from Europe airport that would make flyers life a lot better. A number have grocery stores in them and very large as well a shopping mall. Then there was the large number of places you could eat and drink at.

The departure waiting area were better in most cases in Europe over Pearson with more eating areas as well seating. Impress by Stockholm area as we walk through it upon arrival from Milano.

Was hopping to land from the west to get shots of Mississauga and M City, but came south from the north by 404 (I think) and then west that was new for me.

All airports were service by either one rail line or having Intercity Rail lines stopping there other than Milano that was bus only.

Pearson wasn't ranking very well in Europe
 
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Woodbridge_Heights

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Our trip to Europe and back was a mix bag.

Will never fly Air Transit again, especially the Dreamliner. 3 + 3/4 + 3 rows with no leg room to the point you had to slide in/out of your seat for the 2 and window seat. The A321 gave you leg room coming home. SAS had a lot of leg room.

The biggest issue at Pearson standing in line to check in only to have to stand in another line since there was no gate and the plane was arriving 45 minutes late to get our tickets. Going through screening was short and fast after they test the cameras and laptop. Almost an hour late departing Pearson.

Rome was fast going through custom where you had to scan your passport and photo taken to get through the gate to custom. Custom only look at the passport, stamp and wave us on.

Flying SAS from Milano to Stockholm out of the city terminal was fast with very little time for screening.

Flying from Brussels to Montreal was a pain starting where Air Transit check in was to getting in the wrong line to have our passport check and stamp to leave Europe. Regardless what line you were in to get your passport check and photo check, it was over an hour wait. Screening was real backup to about 30 minute wait and slow going. Had to do my cameras and laptop testing 3 times for unknown reason.

Our flight had to go to Montreal with a 4 hour layover as well changing planes. Planes were 30 minute late departing both Brussels and Montreal.

Was a breeze in Montreal doing custom fill out considering I had already done it on line as well scanning the passport and photo taken. Took less than 2 minutes to clear custom. The walk from one terminal to the other was a pain.

We left T3 on the southside and arrived at a new north terminal that I never knew of considering I rarely follow this thread nor been up at the airport in sometime. That one long walk to get your luggage as well getting some good shots of the airport and planes. 4 long moving walkways.

Based on the airports we saw in Europe, Pearson rank low with Montreal being at the bottom. Brussels would rank 2nd lowest and no idea where to place Rome since I didn't see much of it. Milano would be the 3rd lowest. Zurich, Hamburger, Frankfurt, Copenhagen and Pearson would be my ranking of others.

Hamburger would be #2 just for plane watching with Frankfurt being #1. Disappointed with Frankfurt this time as have the observation deck close due to construction on the terminal, but most of lost of photographing and video shooting. There was a railing system before that has been replace by a 10-12' mesh fence that had only a few openings to shoot. Traffic was very light from what I saw in the past, but caught a few 380's.

Pearson could take a few things from Europe airport that would make flyers life a lot better. A number have grocery stores in them and very large as well a shopping mall. Then there was the large number of places you could eat and drink at.

The departure waiting area were better in most cases in Europe over Pearson with more eating areas as well seating. Impress by Stockholm area as we walk through it upon arrival from Milano.

Was hopping to land from the west to get shots of Mississauga and M City, but came south from the north by 404 (I think) and then west that was new for me.

All airports were service by either one rail line or having Intercity Rail lines stopping there other than Milano that was bus only.

Pearson wasn't ranking very well in Europe

Your Montreal to Toronto flight was on Air Transat yeah? Then you would have arrived at the domestic area of T3 (vs the international area when you flew Toronto to, I'm assuming, Rome). Which is at the North end of the terminal. Not at all a new terminal, though there are recently expanded commuter gates that has garnered some complaints for the walking distances.
 

Streety McCarface

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Our trip to Europe and back was a mix bag.

Will never fly Air Transit again, especially the Dreamliner. 3 + 3/4 + 3 rows with no leg room to the point you had to slide in/out of your seat for the 2 and window seat. The A321 gave you leg room coming home. SAS had a lot of leg room.

The biggest issue at Pearson standing in line to check in only to have to stand in another line since there was no gate and the plane was arriving 45 minutes late to get our tickets. Going through screening was short and fast after they test the cameras and laptop. Almost an hour late departing Pearson.

Rome was fast going through custom where you had to scan your passport and photo taken to get through the gate to custom. Custom only look at the passport, stamp and wave us on.

Flying SAS from Milano to Stockholm out of the city terminal was fast with very little time for screening.

Flying from Brussels to Montreal was a pain starting where Air Transit check in was to getting in the wrong line to have our passport check and stamp to leave Europe. Regardless what line you were in to get your passport check and photo check, it was over an hour wait. Screening was real backup to about 30 minute wait and slow going. Had to do my cameras and laptop testing 3 times for unknown reason.

Our flight had to go to Montreal with a 4 hour layover as well changing planes. Planes were 30 minute late departing both Brussels and Montreal.

Was a breeze in Montreal doing custom fill out considering I had already done it on line as well scanning the passport and photo taken. Took less than 2 minutes to clear custom. The walk from one terminal to the other was a pain.

We left T3 on the southside and arrived at a new north terminal that I never knew of considering I rarely follow this thread nor been up at the airport in sometime. That one long walk to get your luggage as well getting some good shots of the airport and planes. 4 long moving walkways.

Based on the airports we saw in Europe, Pearson rank low with Montreal being at the bottom. Brussels would rank 2nd lowest and no idea where to place Rome since I didn't see much of it. Milano would be the 3rd lowest. Zurich, Hamburger, Frankfurt, Copenhagen and Pearson would be my ranking of others.

Hamburger would be #2 just for plane watching with Frankfurt being #1. Disappointed with Frankfurt this time as have the observation deck close due to construction on the terminal, but most of lost of photographing and video shooting. There was a railing system before that has been replace by a 10-12' mesh fence that had only a few openings to shoot. Traffic was very light from what I saw in the past, but caught a few 380's.

Pearson could take a few things from Europe airport that would make flyers life a lot better. A number have grocery stores in them and very large as well a shopping mall. Then there was the large number of places you could eat and drink at.

The departure waiting area were better in most cases in Europe over Pearson with more eating areas as well seating. Impress by Stockholm area as we walk through it upon arrival from Milano.

Was hopping to land from the west to get shots of Mississauga and M City, but came south from the north by 404 (I think) and then west that was new for me.

All airports were service by either one rail line or having Intercity Rail lines stopping there other than Milano that was bus only.

Pearson wasn't ranking very well in Europe
Air Transat does not fly Dreamliners, they fly A330s, but 3-3-3 on an A330 sounds brutal.
 

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