Solaris

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Found a rendering on &Co's website:

peterrichmond.jpg

wow's thats really cool design ... as if floating on top of the existing building

and the glass structure works really well against the existing brick structure, an addition that is does not appear to be intrusive and over-powering ... well done &CO ! :)
 

Urban Shocker

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An imaginative solution that creates an entirely new entity by renovating two heritage buildings, building a roof terrace, and tying the whole thing together with an atrium. A little bit CCBR, a little bit Distillery, a little bit OCAD even ... and wholly &Co.
 

egotrippin

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I still can't see, judging by the render, how the south side of that building is standing up. It appears that the entire load bearing wall over top of the existing building is glass, which can't be. Perhaps the columns towards the north support it all, but that doesn't seem possible either.

It boggles the mind.
 

Tewder

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An imaginative solution that creates an entirely new entity by renovating two heritage buildings, building a roof terrace, and tying the whole thing together with an atrium. A little bit CCBR, a little bit Distillery, a little bit OCAD even ... and wholly &Co.

Perhaps more so than neo-modernism, which is essentially the equivalent of 'Ye Olde-ism" anyway, this blending of modern glass with heritage brick, the contrasting parts combining for a new whole, is fitting for the title 'Toronto Style'. And so many more examples to cite; Conservatory of Music and National Ballet School, or even the ROM and AGO (from the Grange side at least). I'm not sure to what degree this is being done elsewhere but this is definitely one of the predominant vernacular styles to have emerged in Toronto over the past 5 to 10 years, and it is so much more than facadism. Nice.
 

smuncky

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I still can't see, judging by the render, how the south side of that building is standing up. It appears that the entire load bearing wall over top of the existing building is glass, which can't be. Perhaps the columns towards the north support it all, but that doesn't seem possible either.

It boggles the mind.

the rendering is definitely not showing everything.

there would have to be columns that support that south side. there would also have to be columns on those top floors where as of right now you see open space.
 

alklay

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Perhaps more so than neo-modernism, which is essentially the equivalent of 'Ye Olde-ism" anyway, this blending of modern glass with heritage brick, the contrasting parts combining for a new whole, is fitting for the title 'Toronto Style'. And so many more examples to cite; Conservatory of Music and National Ballet School, or even the ROM and AGO (from the Grange side at least). I'm not sure to what degree this is being done elsewhere but this is definitely one of the predominant vernacular styles to have emerged in Toronto over the past 5 to 10 years, and it is so much more than facadism. Nice.

Blending modernism with heritage is being done everywhere, and nowhere more so than Europe (which has a much wider and deeper stock of heritage).
 

Urban Shocker

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And there's nothing "Ye Olde" about Modernism anyway, within the Toronto context. We've been mainlining it since the 1950's. Stand-alone point towers like Spire, KPMB's cultural additions, Freed's low-rise cluster at King and Bathurst - they're all informed by the same aesthetic.
 

grey

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wow's thats really cool design ... as if floating on top of the existing building

and the glass structure works really well against the existing brick structure, an addition that is does not appear to be intrusive and over-powering ... well done &CO ! :)

We're either not seeing something beneath the building, or that massive elevator core (with "ALLIED" written on it) is supporting the entire thing.
 

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