The way the path runs right into the wall is a bit lazy, no? Surely there was some way for it to fade out or take a turn. I like the project in general though.
 
The way the path runs right into the wall is a bit lazy, no? Surely there was some way for it to fade out or take a turn. I like the project in general though.
The wall is begging for a significant artwork to be placed on or in front of it. I would time its installation to coincide with the opening of the park along side the Yonge Street Slip, and we won't get that until the Tower at Pier 27 is built. Here's hoping something is on Waterfront Toronto and/or the City's radar, funding and competition-wise.

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From Sunday. Looks great from the water.

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The public parking underneath Pier 27 is a nuisance for residents. The amount of traffic in the area on weekends is insane due to the proximity to the island ferries.
 
This project is already extremely secluded given its location - a bit of vehicle traffic going to and from the garage is hardly game ending. The amount of privacy here really shouldn't have been allowed in the first place.
 
And as time moves forward and more people stop expecting to drive everywhere in Toronto, but take up alternative modes of transport in greater numbers… they'll be happier.

Meanwhile, I completely agree with @innsertnamehere: if you want a quiet spot to live in Toronto, this ain't it. The residents of Harbour Square, York Quay, Queens Quay Terminal, and the many buildings on the north side of Queens Quay have known for years that this area of town is very busy in the summer. It's just going to get more so.

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I just don't get the business plan behind building underground parking for the public at a high-end condo. Was it a requirement imposed by the City or did the developer choose to do it? The parking garage is extremely tight which is why there is valet parking. There are tons of accidents down there because of the poor design and dumb drivers not using the mirrors.

You've got Lambo's parked down there being dinged up by some 905er unloading 4 strollers from her minivan. For potential purchasers, that has to be a downside.

The upside is that most people have started using the elevators designed specifically for the public parking. Last year there was tons of non-residents milling about in the condo which is a security concern and created a huge logjam in the resident elevators.
 
I wonder is this is one of the underground garages where the developers were forced by the City to provide a space for every suite as per the bylaw, but where the developers found that they were not able to sell all those spaces. In the last few years, developers have been pleading for (and generally been granted) permission to build fewer parking spaces than suites. I can imagine that through the Committee of Adjustment (whose records are difficult-to-impossible to search through) that the developers may have been permitted to create a public parking lot out of remaining unsold spaces subsequently.

That said, it may not have happened that way, and may always have been in the plan to have public parking to replace spaces lost on the surface.

I have a couple of questions either way:
  1. Why would public and private spaces be mingled? Typically, the public ones come first, with the private ones behind an interior wall/fence.
  2. Why would the public be using the condo elevators? Are those not in a fob-access only area?
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At Maple Leaf Square, public parking is the top two levels with resident parking behind a fob-restricted door. Personally, I'd hate to be a resident there, waiting for the public areas to clear out after a Raptors or Leafs game or a concert at the ACC. I guess you learn to pick your times.
 
I wonder is this is one of the underground garages where the developers were forced by the City to provide a space for every suite as per the bylaw, but where the developers found that they were not able to sell all those spaces. In the last few years, developers have been pleading for (and generally been granted) permission to build fewer parking spaces than suites. I can imagine that through the Committee of Adjustment (whose records are difficult-to-impossible to search through) that the developers may have been permitted to create a public parking lot out of remaining unsold spaces subsequently.

That said, it may not have happened that way, and may always have been in the plan to have public parking to replace spaces lost on the surface.

I have a couple of questions either way:
  1. Why would public and private spaces be mingled? Typically, the public ones come first, with the private ones behind an interior wall/fence.
  2. Why would the public be using the condo elevators? Are those not in a fob-access only area?
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1. The spots are all co-mingled. I'm not sure why. There is commercial, visitor, and resident parking all scattered throughout the garage. I wonder why they wouldn't separate them as you suggested. It may have something to do with trying to cut down on the walk from your car to the applicable elevator. The site is quite large and spread out unlike most condos.

2. At first it was because the parking elevators were not done. You are right that it is a fob-access area, but people are always sneaking in. I saw a ton of non-residents milling about in the resident lobby on the weekend. The doors for the commercial parking elevator and the resident lobby are two feet apart. It's tough to control when there are so many people coming in and out. The concierge isn't close enough to monitor the area (there is one concierge desk for every pair of buildings, on the opposite side of the commercial parking elevators).
 
Your Board should be pushing for a re-shuffling of parking spaces so that the private ones can be secluded behind wall/fence and interior door. I cannot imagine that residents are happy to have to put up with the lessened security of a mixed garage. I believe that mix is very rare in Toronto.

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We have four levels of parking in our building. Top two are public and bottom two are private. You need a fob to access the private parking and then you need the fob to access the condo elevators which go straight to the condo floors. Private and public are strictly separate. Can't imagine having them mixed.
 

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