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ThujaPlicata

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Haha it definitely is, didn't notice your pic there!


There are a few Horse Chestnuts in spots around the city, some relatively large. Victoria is full of them and they are massive!
We have many Ohio buckeye species planted around Calgary - these trees have smaller leaves and leaflets. The species planted in Cameron avenue are definitely horse chestnut because of the massive leaves/leaflets and distinct bark.

Yeah Victoria and Vancouver have many planted around because of the super mild climate. The ones in Victoria in the older streets are immense - I'm super excited to know we have some surviving in Calgary. @Surrealplaces yeah these trees could definitely not grow in more open suburbia landscapes like the ones you mentioned.
 

JoeUrban

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One thing I've often wondered about are some truly spectacular streets in relatively new suburbs in Calgary, like Midnapore (see below), which wasn't built until the late 1970s. Were these trees really only planted 40 years ago?View attachment 317372
The epic tree-lined streets like 19th Avenue NW and others in Crescent heights and the rest of the 'North hill' that was quoted above were only planted in the 1960s
 

ThujaPlicata

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The epic tree-lined streets like 19th Avenue NW and others in Crescent heights and the rest of the 'North hill' that was quoted above were only planted in the 1960s
These streets were planted with poplars which grow very fast and have a broad canopy spread. They mature very fast compared to other trees because they are adapted to our climate. Sadly these trees are short lived and have heart rot early on leading to structural damage.
Also the root damage on foundations/sidewalks etc is another thing... 🙃
 

MichaelS

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Aren't these elm trees? Sorry, I am terrible as an armchair horticulturalist, I really struggle with identification, but I feel like I can tell a poplar from an elm. However, I am fully prepared to admit defeat and take the commensurate level of embarrassment i if these are in fact poplars:
 

Geo_Jedi

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Aren't these elm trees? Sorry, I am terrible as an armchair horticulturalist, I really struggle with identification, but I feel like I can tell a poplar from an elm. However, I am fully prepared to admit defeat and take the commensurate level of embarrassment i if these are in fact poplars:
Those are indeed American Elms:

1633359686231.png


https://maps.calgary.ca/TreeSchedule/
 

Mountain Man

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Definitely Elm. Poplars get really big, but aren't as attractive a tree as an Elm, so it's super easy to tell the difference. Poplars drop as many small branches and twigs as leaves, really messy trees and they aren't very strong.
 

ThujaPlicata

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Aren't these elm trees? Sorry, I am terrible as an armchair horticulturalist, I really struggle with identification, but I feel like I can tell a poplar from an elm. However, I am fully prepared to admit defeat and take the commensurate level of embarrassment i if these are in fact poplars:
Those are elms along side 19th avenue. the ones that were in the picture https://skyrisecities.com/forum/attachments/317372/ are poplars. Bit of confusion… whoops!
 

The Familia

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I think it's pretty simple. Poplars should only be planted in open park spaces or alongside major roads/highways with massive buffer zones to act as a sound barrier (along Deerfoot or Stoney) or provide some greenery and beauty. In fact, I would plant 1000's of these along all our major roads and fill large parks with them. These trees will grow quickly and the mess they leave behind will not really impact anything. They should never be planted in medians, tight spaces, or along sidewalks.

Elms (if taken care of) are great along sidewalks and promenades. If the medians are wide enough they would also do alright there as well.
 

ThujaPlicata

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No worries on the confusion. So, were the elms planted in the 60s on the street I linked to, or was that in reference to the poplars in your picture?
I was referring to the picture of Midnapore and the poplars - not 19th avenue NE with Elms!

Poplars look great when healthy - but like @The Familia stated, I agree these tree species should only be planted in open spaces - not along sidewalks or tight spaces. Manitoba Maple is another example
 

Mountain Man

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Yeah poplars are a really soft wood and drop tons of small branches and twigs all the time. Not to mention the sticky seed things in the spring and the cotton fuzz in June / July lol. Total agree the city should plant tons of these, along Deerfoot would be the first spot I put them. Elm are the best street tree, read that a Siberian Elm is resistant to DED, though they only get about half the size.
 

The Familia

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Would love to see more Russian Olive around the city. There are a few along the off ramp of McKnight and Deerfoot by the Italian store that look really good.
 

googspecial

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Would love to see more Russian Olive around the city. There are a few along the off ramp of McKnight and Deerfoot by the Italian store that look really good.
A few along the 16 Ave NE freeway too. They struggle to establish, but once they do, are great and provide some nice contrast. The native Wolf Willow is related to the Russian Olive, though it is a shrub, not a tree. They have the same textures and colours as Russian Olive and produce a nice thicket. Would also be a great choice along the freeways of the city.
 

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