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They could get around part of their issues by switching to a headway based subway operation, while ditching the schedules. They like to come up with excuses all the time, but in reality they (management) have control over all these issues. I cant tell people the amount of times that their "scheduling" has led to a whole host of issues throughout the system.
 
They could get around part of their issues by switching to a headway based subway operation, while ditching the schedules. They like to come up with excuses all the time, but in reality they (management) have control over all these issues. I cant tell people the amount of times that their "scheduling" has led to a whole host of issues throughout the system.

With ATC this should be less of an issue. Right now the headways are so tight that one train arrives as the other is leaving.

It is not uncommon to see trains mid-afternoon at St George back to back. Recently I have seen one train just passing the Crossover while another train enters the station.
 
They could get around part of their issues by switching to a headway based subway operation, while ditching the schedules.

The problem is that the subway goes directly from zero to full capacity in the mornings. They have to get 106 trains out of their respective yards as quickly as possible, and some of the trains have to go to storage tracks rather than going into service (one each at St Clair West, Union, Eglinton, south of York Mills and somewhere on Bloor-Danforth) to fill in any gaps in service.
 
They could get around part of their issues by switching to a headway based subway operation, while ditching the schedules. They like to come up with excuses all the time, but in reality they (management) have control over all these issues. I cant tell people the amount of times that their "scheduling" has led to a whole host of issues throughout the system.
I think it's the union that doesn't like workers not having a defined work schedule. They have to schedule around when an employee takes his/her break at a specific location. I think it would be easier with one person train operation. Obviously it would be better if the system runs fully automatic and let the computer do whatever it wants. Maybe Ford would take over the system and forces the subway to run fully automated.
 
The problem is that the subway goes directly from zero to full capacity in the mornings. They have to get 106 trains out of their respective yards as quickly as possible, and some of the trains have to go to storage tracks rather than going into service (one each at St Clair West, Union, Eglinton, south of York Mills and somewhere on Bloor-Danforth) to fill in any gaps in service.
Clearly that's a tricky endeavor, but if you've ever paid close attention you'll notice that there are often times where trains have to hold their position irrespective where they are on the line because they are adhering to schedules. May not sound like an issue, but take for example Greenwood Yard- the main yard for the Bloor-Danforth Line. On a daily basis there are trains that hold at timing point signals (which essentially help trains stick to schedules) at various points on the eastern end of the line. If a train is delayed getting out of the yard (at it's designated scheduled time), trains operating on the service line often have to hold wherever they are and wait until the yard train gets out of the yard since the schedules get out of wack throughout the system. This causes backups on the service line due to the cascading effect.

Now if the TTC used a headway based schedule, it wouldnt matter what time said train left the yard, so long as there is adequate spacing between trains throughout the line. As a result, trains would be able to leave the yard more efficiently and wouldn't be waiting around until X time to leave.

Obviously i'm simplifying the whole situation because it's a bit more complex than what i'm explaining. However various other things could happen behind the scene that could still complicated trains exiting a yard for service (ie: trains being ready for service from maintenance, crew availability, etc...)
 
From the TTC website, at this link:

Important information for PRESTO card customers
Starting July 29, PRESTO card customers will be able to use their PRESTO card to pay their MiWay fare on TTC buses that travel to and from Mississauga.​
  • You will simply tap your PRESTO card when you board the bus in Mississauga and your MiWay fare will be deducted.
  • When you arrive in Toronto, tap before you exit the bus to pay your TTC fare.
Starting August 26, PRESTO card customers will be able to use their PRESTO card to pay their YRT fare on TTC buses that travel to and from York Region.​
  • You will simply tap your PRESTO card when you board the bus in York Region and your YRT fare will be deducted.
  • When you arrive in Toronto, tap before you exit the bus to pay your TTC fare.
Until these changes are introduced you must pay your YRT and/or MiWay fare as you do today (TTC fare plus a supplement, cash or YRT and/or MiWay fare product). The same applies for the reverse. When you board a TTC bus in York Region or Mississauga you must deposit your YRT and/or MiWay fare or cash in the fare box. If you want to pay your TTC fare by PRESTO, you must tap your card when you leave the bus in Toronto.​
 
From the TTC website, at this link:

Important information for PRESTO card customers
Starting July 29, PRESTO card customers will be able to use their PRESTO card to pay their MiWay fare on TTC buses that travel to and from Mississauga.​

  • You will simply tap your PRESTO card when you board the bus in Mississauga and your MiWay fare will be deducted.
  • When you arrive in Toronto, tap before you exit the bus to pay your TTC fare.
Starting August 26, PRESTO card customers will be able to use their PRESTO card to pay their YRT fare on TTC buses that travel to and from York Region.​

  • You will simply tap your PRESTO card when you board the bus in York Region and your YRT fare will be deducted.
  • When you arrive in Toronto, tap before you exit the bus to pay your TTC fare.
Until these changes are introduced you must pay your YRT and/or MiWay fare as you do today (TTC fare plus a supplement, cash or YRT and/or MiWay fare product). The same applies for the reverse. When you board a TTC bus in York Region or Mississauga you must deposit your YRT and/or MiWay fare or cash in the fare box. If you want to pay your TTC fare by PRESTO, you must tap your card when you leave the bus in Toronto.​

I dont think thats the right link

 
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I am probably west coasting here, but was it noted here that the TTC got rid of the estimated arrival time for subway trains on the video monitors? It now only shows the scheduled service frequency, ie. "every 4 minutes".
 
Apparently they are labeling the shuttle bays at Warden.
20190725_133235.jpg
 
I am probably west coasting here, but was it noted here that the TTC got rid of the estimated arrival time for subway trains on the video monitors? It now only shows the scheduled service frequency, ie. "every 4 minutes".
I only see that happen occasionally, usually when there's a significant delay or when next train data isn't available.
 

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