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Yeah I'm also listening, I just find it interesting that almost all of the opposition so far has been from residents in the wealthiest communities in the city (mount royal, elboya, etc.).

I just realized that of course it's a lot of wealthy communities because those are the key "R1" communities.
Other inner-city communities that already allow a mix of development may be less concerned.
I personally don't think SFH-only communities need to exist as a policy. Any SFH-only communities that are a century old are welcome to create SFH enclaves by getting together and as a group designating their homes as protected historic resources.
 
It's actually amazing that like 80% of the opposition is from the communities along the elbow.

Truth is, even if the guidebook is passed, I doubt it would change much for these communities. These neighbourhoods have pretty much exhausted the supply of houses suitable for redevelopment. The vast majority of properties are either restored or well kept heritage houses or newly minted mansions. Neither is at much risk of being torn down anytime soon.

And even the few that are, I suspect that the demand for houses in these neighbourhoods would be mostly single detached anyways.
 
Oh god. I joined Nextdoor (Altadore) not really realizing what it was and now I deeply regret it. It's all just anxiety-ridden baby boomers freaking out that they saw a suspicious van driving down their street, or a bobcat in the local park, and (of course) every NIMBY cliche you can imagine. They see RNDSQR as public enemy number one and they're all completely up in arms over the Guidebook. I've held myself back from posting because I just do not want to deal with the headache of getting into an argument with unreasonable people. The other day someone literally posted about "suspicious people" taking pictures of a house that was for sale! I wish this was an exaggeration, but it's not.

I have this theory that all of the upper-class retirees in this city suffer a deep level of status anxiety rooted in a secret feeling that the wealth they accumulated during oil booms is actually undeserved and one day it will all be taken away from them. It's the only way I can make sense of the amount of fear I'm observing.
 
Are there any city planning historians on the board? 😄 I wonder if when most of the inner-city was first zoned as R2 back in the... 80s? 60s? before? If there was the same kind of angst from those communities as the formerly-known-as-R1 communities now.
 
Oh god. I joined Nextdoor (Altadore) not really realizing what it was and now I deeply regret it. It's all just anxiety-ridden baby boomers freaking out that they saw a suspicious van driving down their street, or a bobcat in the local park, and (of course) every NIMBY cliche you can imagine. They see RNDSQR as public enemy number one and they're all completely up in arms over the Guidebook. I've held myself back from posting because I just do not want to deal with the headache of getting into an argument with unreasonable people. The other day someone literally posted about "suspicious people" taking pictures of a house that was for sale! I wish this was an exaggeration, but it's not.

I have this theory that all of the upper-class retirees in this city suffer a deep level of status anxiety rooted in a secret feeling that the wealth they accumulated during oil booms is actually undeserved and one day it will all be taken away from them. It's the only way I can make sense of the amount of fear I'm observing.
It used to be better when I first joined, as it was a way of finding out what was happening around the neighborhood. ie, why did that business close? or what was the swat team doing at that house down the road? Quite a few of the people in the north central area where I am are reasonable, but more and more I'm seeing people who are truly out to lunch. I had a debate with a guy a while back on the benefits on why density is needed and the cost issues we face with sprawl. His comment was that density is causing his taxes to go up....and the proof is that every time new multi-family developments are built his taxes seem to go up.

Because of our market assessment tax system, he could be partly right, but he didn't understand why there would be extra costs with sprawl, even after I explained the costs of new schools, roads, and other infrastructure.
 
It used to be better when I first joined, as it was a way of finding out what was happening around the neighborhood. ie, why did that business close? or what was the swat team doing at that house down the road? Quite a few of the people in the north central area where I am are reasonable, but more and more I'm seeing people who are truly out to lunch. I had a debate with a guy a while back on the benefits on why density is needed and the cost issues we face with sprawl. His comment was that density is causing his taxes to go up....and the proof is that every time new multi-family developments are built his taxes seem to go up.

Because of our market assessment tax system, he could be partly right, but he didn't understand why there would be extra costs with sprawl, even after I explained the costs of new schools, roads, and other infrastructure.
I saw a great Instagram post recently that I think was by S2 Architecture on the servicing costs for inner city vs. suburban homes in Winnipeg. I think it was a story though and wish I had gotten a screen grab, but the cost was ~2x higher for suburban homes.
 
It's actually amazing that like 80% of the opposition is from the communities along the elbow.

Truth is, even if the guidebook is passed, I doubt it would change much for these communities. These neighbourhoods have pretty much exhausted the supply of houses suitable for redevelopment. The vast majority of properties are either restored or well kept heritage houses or newly minted mansions. Neither is at much risk of being torn down anytime soon.

And even the few that are, I suspect that the demand for houses in these neighbourhoods would be mostly single detached anyways.

look, we just can’t take the risk of Elbow Park turning into a post-apocalyptic hellscape like Hillhurst, where people in $1.4 million single detached houses have to live ON THE SAME STREET as people in $1.2 million semi-detached houses and $1 million row houses.
 
Just reading the CC stream below the video, I'm assuming this is not correct lol

THERE HAVE BEEN FEW INCIDENTS IN
THE AREA, OF THERE HAS BEEN A
MURDER A COUPLE OF BLOCKS OVER,
IN THE GROUP HOME TYPESETTING
UNION
WHO LIVES DOWN FROM ME,
THEY ARE RENTER, NOT VERY
PERSONABLE.


Frickin typesetters, scourge of the innercity

1616521005576.png
 
"once that row housing goes in, people will stop investing in their single family home and the community will not attract more single family homeowners."

1616542330649.png
 
"once that row housing goes in, people will stop investing in their single family home and the community will not attract more single family homeowners."

View attachment 307561
I used to get the oil changed every three months on my F250, but then my neighbor got an F150 so now I am just going to drive it until the engine seizes. By next year, all the vehicles on my street will be undriveable.
 
There's a lot of thoughtful points which could form specific amendments but the many "think of the sfh! " comments drowns them out I fear.
 

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