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That's an interesting point, James. Sometimes we read stuff which suggests the opposite, but it's hard to know.

Nope not necessarily - someone who truly feel for their crimes will probably move heaven and earth to seek to make amends and gladly suffer punishment (because penance and suffering can be interpreted as a just fate for the pain inflicted - putting aside that is also a form of selfishness, but let's not get too deep)

Someone who applies for early parole out of their own volition probably doesn't satisfy said conditions above.

AoD
 
but even after these perpetrators do their time, I don't believe that they will live every remaining day of their life thinking about the impact of their actions on the victims but rather about the impact the victim's death has had on their own life.
Of course not. You do the crime, do the time, and move on. The human mind is capable of compartalizing and forgetting trauma, guilt, etc. especially in anyone with a sociopathic personality.
 
Nope not necessarily - someone who truly feel for their crimes will probably move heaven and earth to seek to make amends and gladly suffer punishment (because penance and suffering can be interpreted as a just fate for the pain inflicted - putting aside that is also a form of selfishness, but let's not get too deep)

Someone who applies for early parole out of their own volition probably doesn't satisfy said conditions above.

AoD
exactly. Did Muzzo ever break down and cry - and repeatedly? Someone who is truly remorseful would have and it would easily have been obvious to evryone. But then again no trial took place for stuff to come out and affect Muzzo to tears
 
I believe Marco Muzzo's sad face is overwhelmingly a result of him acknowledging that those 4 people who died have ruined his wedding plans. :oops:
 
Depends how terrible - there are crimes that more or less becomes coup de grace for certain family names.

AoD

Maybe that's why you never hear of anyone with the name "Hitler" anymore.

Wonder what would happen if someone named "Smith" committed a mass atrocity?
 
I would agree that the tears are probably for himself.. I would cry too if someone said I was going to jail. That does not mean that they are not sorry for what happened. I will give the person the benefit and say that they probably have felt the guilt and or cried about what had happened some other time.
 
Maybe that's why you never hear of anyone with the name "Hitler" anymore.
Wonder what would happen if someone named "Smith" committed a mass atrocity?

Yep (though I think there is an article about the experience of someone with that name), and yes I did think about that possibility - but hard to predict the outcome until it happens (hopefully never) - maybe they'd call themselves Smyth.

AoD
 
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In Italy, there are many good people whose surname is Mussolini, but don't want to be associated with a man named Benito. Mussolini was Hitler's ally for a long time.
 
Mississauga is changing the name of Marco Muzzo park by adding a "senior" to the end.
What happens if the young Marco has a kid - then he becomes the Sr?
Do these people not have middle names?

http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2016/03/30/mississaugas-muzzo-park-gets-a-tweak-to-its-name.html

Only if he names his kid Marco as well, which - if he's smart - he won't. He's probably re-evaluating some life plans as it is ... imagine having to explain to your future offspring that you killed four people?
 
Maybe that's why you never hear of anyone with the name "Hitler" anymore.

Wonder what would happen if someone named "Smith" committed a mass atrocity?

Many of Hitler's surviving relatives tacitly agreed among themselves not to have children, plus Hitler's father changed the name from 'Hiedler' (various spellings of the same name had been used interchangeably until then). Hitler had a half-brother who was using the name 'Hiller' at the time of his death, as well as a British-born nephew who served in the US Navy during WW2 (as 'William Hitler', no less) before changing his name.

As for notorious criminals with commonplace names, that also happens but the notoriety is not so much associated with the name as with the actions. My own last name is not uncommon in its area of origin but it is also the same as that of two WW2-era war criminals as well as various politicians, scientists, etc. from before that time and since that time who are no less well remembered.
 

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