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EagleEye

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I wonder when Dean French's book will come out, he seems to have vanished but he would know where all the bodies are buried.
 

adma

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The fewer of those, the better. Who needs Council, anyway? Or for that matter, who needs the Legislature? Abolish it all, and let Boss Ford appoint his buds--who likewise are "independently wealthy" (don't ask how)

Or let's go further here--elections are a waste of taxpayers' dollars. So, abolish *those*--after all, when you have leaders who are truly For The People, elections are redundant...
 

animatronic

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Or let's go further here--elections are a waste of taxpayers' dollars. So, abolish *those*--after all, when you have leaders who are truly For The People, elections are redundant...
My friends, we all know that democracy is just a crazy Marxist plot to take money out of the pockets of hard-working Ontario taxpayers.

And that’s why help is on the way.
 

BurlOak

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Or let's go further here--elections are a waste of taxpayers' dollars. So, abolish *those*--after all, when you have leaders who are truly For The People, elections are redundant...
No. Elections are mandatory.
Maybe we could pass some type of law that the governing party can use taxpayer money to campaign while the opposition cannot campaign in elections - even with their own money.
With the tax credit for political donations, this may save some money.
 

DSC

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Planning Act and LPAT/OMG

https://www.ontariocanada.com/registry/view.do?postingId=29747&language=en

The Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing (MMAH) is proposing to amend Ontario Regulation 525/97 (Exemption from Approval (Official Plan Amendments)) under the Planning Act in order to exempt certain municipalities from the requirement to obtain the Minister's approval of official plan amendments.

The proposed amendment would identify the following three (3) municipalities which have brought their official plans up-to-date with provincial policy since late 2012 as being exempt from the requirement to obtain the Minister's approval of their official plan amendments:
1. Haliburton County
2. Hastings County
3. United Counties of Leeds & Grenville

It is proposed that the regulation would exempt from the Minister's approval official plan amendments of the identified municipalities commenced on or after September 1, 2019.

Well, well, well. Where does the Minister come from? Leeds-Grenville!
 

adma

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No. Elections are mandatory.
Maybe we could pass some type of law that the governing party can use taxpayer money to campaign while the opposition cannot campaign in elections - even with their own money.
With the tax credit for political donations, this may save some money.

I'm not sure whether to be frightened at the possibly dead serious tone of BurlOak's response to my tongue-in-cheek post.
 

Videodrome

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Jonny5

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In a shocker, Christine Elliott admits problems with a lack of beds in hospitals are "complex" and will take much longer than Doug Ford thought to resolve. Possibly years longer. It turns out the problems weren't simply 'lazy millionnaire hospital administrators'. Who could have guessed running hospitals wasn't like running a business that prints labels? Who could have guessed it wasn't as easy as changing a colour cartridge when they print the wrong colour on a label?
 
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tiffer24

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It's like the right hand doesn't know what the right hand is doing...

Ford said last week that his government would end hallway medicine within the next 12 months.

Elliott says addressing the issue will require the government to build more long-term care spaces, improve addictions and mental-health funding, and address hospital patient flows.

The Ontario Health Coalition says Ford will not be able to fulfill his promise because the latest provincial budget did not have the funding required to build capacity within the system.

https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/07...downplays-premier-fords-health-care-comments/
 
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Northern Light

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On hallway medicine............

Some of the required investments, are medium-term or longer, as noted, such as more long-term care beds.

Though, that's largely discussing ERs of course.

There are a variety of other investments/changes that government could make, a quite a few are straight-forward enough.

Its merely that a) they cost money; b) change is always difficult and will invariably ruffle a few feathers.

Let me provide a couple of examples.

I had occasions to find myself in an ER recently, in wee hours of the morning.

The matter was suited to what you might call a 'green zone' or 'ambulatory'' ER treatment, as opposed to main Emerg.

There actually weren't that many people waiting at that time; perhaps 3 when I arrived.

Not one person was seen during the next 4 hours.

Reason: The ambulatory or non-complex side of this ER at a major, downtown Toronto teaching hospital was closed until 8am. They wouldn't entertain seeing those types of cases on the main Emerg side with only one doctor working.

The result, by the time the easy-case wing opened, the line of people was 14 deep and with standees.

The simple choice to have one more doctor on overnights and likely open an extra nursing station with a minimum of 2 nursing staff, would have eliminated this issue.

Of course, that costs money; but actually surprisingly little in the context of a major hospital budget. I know, as I had a follow up conversation with hospital management.

The cost of opening the additional ER space for an extra six hours per day was estimated at about $700,000 per year. This hospital has a budget roughly 1000x that size.

The real issue had to do with compelling doctors to work the shift in question, not the money. So a funding increase of 0.1%, which scaled to other hospitals in the province which operate similarly would cost something like $20M per year or 0.04% of health spending in Ontario.

Its hardly the only problem of its type.

In respect of ERs a shift in triage philosophy was piloted at different hospitals in which a physician assessed everyone who came into the ER within 20 minutes.

This did not involve a material increase in resources, but rather a reduction in nurse/orderly staff and an increase of 1 doctor.

The intent was to remove anyone who could be quickly assessed and sent home, with or without prescriptions/stitches etc.

The result, far few beds occupied by people awaiting assessment, which in turn means no one on a stretcher without a room.

In the test, the results were resoundingly positive in smaller hospitals; with about 80% success in larger teaching environments.

It was only the in the latter case, where the absence of LTC beds periodically (about 1 day out of 5) caused a back-up into the ER as patients who needed to be admitted to the hospital could not be.

Despite that success, and a clear instruction on where to prioritize change, the province has not rolled this pilots out.
 

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