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Thank you. As I later said, no worries.

I agree that there's a lot of antipathy to Italian politicans, but they have established themselves quite well, and there is some infighting that seems to plague many of them. As the Indo-Canadian community rises as a political force, I am sure many of the same things will happen there.

I don't mind many in your list - Pantalone (except his local pet-projects, like FSE and the Dufferin bus), Pupatello (there are some ministers I like in the McGunity cabinet I like, some I detest - like Sorbara or Dwight Duncan). I would add Rosario Marchese, whom I like as well. I don't care that much for Nunziata (either of them) anymore, but Frances is a good local councillor for her area, which explains her popularity, Augimeri is also suprisingly good local councillor, though her voting record is very mushy.

Now, back to the Red Hill Creek disaster....
 
I actually took a picture of the Red Hill Parkway last week, supposed to open in November. This is looking south from the King St. overpass:
00003.jpg
 
Now, back to the Red Hill Creek disaster....

Sean, what is it with you picking on every Canadian expressway of Red Hill Creek background? :)
 
It looks almost done except for the QEW interchange.

If I were the City, I'd open it up to bikes and pedestrains, just for fun, from Barton to Mud St, maybe even charge a voluntary toll. At least until the QEW mess is finished.
 
This is sort of off topic, but does anyone have any pictures or aerial photos of the area where the Linc is now, but before the Linc was built? Also, does anyone have any pictures of the Upper Gage and Limeridge intersection before the Linc? I live near there, but my earliest memories of the area involve the construction. As such, I'm curious as to what things looked like beforehand, and my parents suck at describing things. Anyone who happens to have any of this stuff handy or knows where I can find them will have my infinite thanks. :)
 
There was a protected ROW corridor for years. No buildings there. I'll post a pic that I took of it in the mid 90s when I find it.
 
This is sort of off topic, but does anyone have any pictures or aerial photos of the area where the Linc is now, but before the Linc was built? Also, does anyone have any pictures of the Upper Gage and Limeridge intersection before the Linc? I live near there, but my earliest memories of the area involve the construction. As such, I'm curious as to what things looked like beforehand, and my parents suck at describing things. Anyone who happens to have any of this stuff handy or knows where I can find them will have my infinite thanks. :)

I have one from 1954. I'll see if I can scare it up.
 
I will love both of you forever if you can dig those pictures up. I was aware that it was a protected right of way corridor, I just want to see what the area was like with Limeridge running straight through and no massive expressway in the middle of everything. Thanks.
 
Desecration

Sad to look at the photos and seeing Hamilton wipe out its only redeeming feature (the Red Hill Valley).

Let's be honest, there waterfront is crap, there economy is in the tank, and rather than revitalize their downtown, they simply crap all over there only remaining greenspace.

Very sad.
 
The Red Hill Valley is hardly Hamilton's only asset. The edge of the Mountain, Cootes Paradise, Dundas, and other spots are all beautiful.
 
Sad to look at the photos and seeing Hamilton wipe out its only redeeming feature (the Red Hill Valley).

Oh, do give us a break, please. I lived there for years; I never even HEARD of the place until they started building the expressway.

But I think I'd be willing to see it go by the board so long as all those who opposed it lined up to give their jobs to those who supported it and were without. You can't eat scenery, but I suppose they could certainly try, having the courage of their convictions. That's if they have.
 
I will love both of you forever if you can dig those pictures up. I was aware that it was a protected right of way corridor, I just want to see what the area was like with Limeridge running straight through and no massive expressway in the middle of everything. Thanks.

Photo from 1954, with modern map to give context. Living where you do, you'll be interested to see, I think, that Limeridge Road once met Garth straight on. Sometime in the 70s, I believe, the curve down to Garth was put in in anticipation of the eventual construction of the Linc.

1367762851_9fc525c161_o.png


1367775727_230f215da3_o.png
 
You Can too eat the scenery

You can too eat the scenery, though that's hardly the point.

But just to make that one anyway......

The Redhill Valley contained:

Black Walnut Trees
American Chestnut Trees
Canada Plum Trees
Butternut Trees

Prefer Berries?

How about:

Wild Strawberry
Red Raspberry
Black Raspberry
Blackberry
Mountain Cranberry
Elderberry (makes great jam)

And all thos plants and more.....sustain deer..amongst a host of other wildlife...

Venison chops anyone?

******

Now that silly correction out of the way....

Greenery is important because it makes a community livable and attractive.

Let's be clear, what fails Hamilton is that people like me want nothing to do with it.

Whether or not you like that fact, or consider it prissy there are a great many of us in Ontario who enjoy 'scenery', we also enjoy vibrant streetscapes, lively downtowns, great jazz bars, beautiful beaches, loft condos, great nightlife, and nice architecture.

And most people in Ontario who enjoy those things view Hamilton in the same breath as Scarborough....except Scarborough has Rouge Park....and no smokestacks worth talking about.

And its much closer to downtown Toronto.

****

The Red Hill Valley expressway won't create one new job, construction aside.

What it will do is leave downtown Hamilton that much emptier, making it easier for people to pass the core by, and to live further afield, destroying yet more forests and farms.

Ulimatlely, that's a drag on taxes, as more responsible people with long-term vision subsidize people whose only thoughts are to shorter-commute times and cheaper housing.
 
Hamilton's assets

Let's be clear, I like Cootes Paradise, I've hiked through it.

I think Dundas is great.

Neither is really 'in' Hamilton.

They are legally a part of the Amalgamated City, but that is in name only.

And ask Residents of Dundas whether they're happy about it......

(the answer is no)
 

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