Amare

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...so you're saying you don't like the squiggly bits? 🙀
Im more surprised that he doesn't like what Marlin Spring is proposing here, they always provide us top notch quality work. So top notch it's like the more work they do, the better their work becomes.

Cant you see, Marlin Spring has changed their ways!

*Note: All of the above statements I mention above are not true.
 

UtakataNoAnnex

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Im more surprised that he doesn't like what Marlin Spring is proposing here, they always provide us top notch quality work. So top notch it's like the more work they do, the better their work becomes.

Cant you see, Marlin Spring has changed their ways!

*Note: All of the above statements I mention above are not true.
Duly noted Amare-san. I did detect a hint of /sarcasm in your post before reading the disclaimer. 😼
 

shammyjammy

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Radiator fin style buildings (wraparound balconies) are so depressingly poor when it comes to thermal performance of the building envelope. If this was a mid-rise, whatever, I wouldn't be too bothered. But for a building of this size, what a colossal waste of energy! IIRC (correct me if I'm wrong as this could be outdated), SB-10 of the OBC permits projections such as balconies to not be thermally-broken as long as they're under 2% of the envelope area. I'm not sure where this building falls in relation to that 2% figure tbh. Either way, the thermal performance of the building can be much better if they didn't have wraparound balconies. Architects should be forward looking, seeking to meet TGS. How do we plan to meet our green goals if we keep churning out buildings like this? Having witnessed so much conversation through school (not even as an architect) / industry events that try to redefine the status quo for energy efficient design, this is thoroughly disappointing.

My other beef is with the longstanding Toronto tradition of using balcony slabs as the main instrument of building form modulation. It's overdone and plain lazy. As an example, although I and many others like Pinnacle One Yonge's building form, I really don't enjoy the fact that balcony slabs were used to accomplish it. At this building though, they didn't even try. Just square...seriously?

The squiggles make me a bit woozy. Just thinking about it makes me want to regurgitate the ramen I didn't have. And who's idea was it? A 5-year old? SMH.

I realize that a lot (if not all) of the aesthetic decisions were likely vetoed by Marlin Spring. But I'm still not letting Wallman off the hook.
 

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