W. K. Lis

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Right, once the plan is posted, it's database time.

42
Since today is National Day of Truth and Reconciliation in Canada, likely little work will be done on it. With the following Friday, they'll make it a l-o-n-g weekend. So maybe Monday. (After getting some time off for a flu vaccination.)
 

interchange42

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Since today is National Day of Truth and Reconciliation in Canada, likely little work will be done on it. With the following Friday, they'll make it a l-o-n-g weekend. So maybe Monday. (After getting some time off for a flu vaccination.)
It's impossible to predict how many days it will take for the documents to be posted. Sometimes they appear as soon as the day after they are submitted, but they often take a couple weeks to go up, sometimes longer.

42
 

Northern Light

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Like this? LOL

Just went in yesterday. No Docs or details yet.

View attachment 352427


No Docs yet; but we do have a description:

1634632975551.png


As a list:

Height: 59s
Unit Count: 650
Residential GFA: 44,259.6m2
Non-Res GFA: 655m2
Res. Parking: 158 spaces
Comm./Visitor Parking: 67
Carshare parking: 5
Bike Parking 586+66
 

toaster29

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Only 158 parking spaces for 650 units - here in Etobicoke? Very dense node with no rapid transit options.
 

UrbanDan

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Only 158 parking spaces for 650 units - here in Etobicoke? Very dense node with no rapid transit options.
Maybe there are plans to extend the Ontario Line to here and residents will have to wait only for couple of decades until it actually gets to HBS :)

But to your point, I don't think that a single GO station is good enough for a density that HBS will have in a decade or two
 

Amare

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But to your point, I don't think that a single GO station is good enough for a density that HBS will have in a decade or two
You're right it most certainly is not, but here we are building the second densest node in all of Canada next to St.James Town. It's the Toronto logic, build tremendous amounts of density in areas with very little support infrastructure.

This development will just add to that, and I doubt we'll be seeing anything of benefit to the community here (ie: child care space, community space, etc...)
 

Undead

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IIRC, something like 55 or 60% of HBS residents work downtown.

Assuming 1.7 occupants per unit on average and 80% of them being in the workforce (higher than the city average of 55% because this is a young, urban professional area), that's 884 people in total commuting to work; 40%, or 353, will not be taking GO downtown. 158 parking spots is enough to handle almost half of the latter.

The rest will likely be taking the TTC to destinations outside downtown.

I think this is a good modal split for a high density area (60% GO, 17% driving, 23% TTC).
 
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DopeyFish

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to be fair 2150 is going to be the development doing all the heavy lifting for community space

it's also not just a GO train to go here. LRT is coming as well and will be in its own ROW from humber bay shores to downtown
 

UrbanDan

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here we are building the second densest node in all of Canada
Will it really be the second densest node in all of Canada? Is this after everything that is in the works gets built? Is it from a study?

I agree that the Toronto's logic is upsidedown. For such a growing area, that generates so much tax revenue (from both construction and residents), high order transit, schools, community space should be a normal thing, not a luxury.

I would go even further and ask for a museum, or a theatre where there are so many people and construction. But maybe I had lived in Europe for too long 😂
 

UrbanDan

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I think this is a good modal split for a high density area (60% GO, 17% driving, 23% TTC).
I would agree with you, if there was a good connection to the subway system for those taking the ttc and if one could get to most of the employment areas without a car in Toronto. Maybe that will be the case in (more than a) few decades, but it's definitely not the case now.

Don't get me wrong, I would love to see even fewer parking spaces in the future, but infrastructure is just not there yet and it's debatable when/if it will be for HBS...
 

Amare

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Will it really be the second densest node in all of Canada? Is this after everything that is in the works gets built? Is it from a study?

I agree that the Toronto's logic is upsidedown. For such a growing area, that generates so much tax revenue (from both construction and residents), high order transit, schools, community space should be a normal thing, not a luxury.

I would go even further and ask for a museum, or a theatre where there are so many people and construction. But maybe I had lived in Europe for too long 😂
Here's a good start to start plucking some information:

Toronto's density as of 2018 was around 4,457 people per square kilometre. Humber Bay had around 11,400 people living there based off the 2016 census, St.James Town had around 18,000. Depending on which numbers you look at (development wise on the number of buildings/units proposed) which to be honest i'm lazy to calculate right now, Humber Bay is expected to add another 10,000 residents. St.James Town is fairly close to being maxed out at this point.

St.James Town has a population density of 44,000+ sq.km as of 2016. It has an area of about 0.22km.sq:

Humber Bay is trickier to calculate since most figures lump in Mimico which is generally much lower density, rough 5,000sq.km as of 2016. As I note, these numbers are severely underestimated, however Humber Bay has an area of about 0.60km.sq (area bounded south of the Gardiner, east of Mimico creek, west of Humber Bay river):


Based on the heat map below, Humber Bay had a 110% increase in population from 2011-2016, St.James town when you add it's areas together about ~5-6%. Humber Bay I circled in red, St.James Town in Blue:
1634672968502.png


So based on all those numbers, it becomes pretty evident to see where Humber Bay is, and where it's heading.
 

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