Strange Advance

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I don't recall if it was the very first design (which was 800+ ft), but the one in post #1308 is, to me, preferable to the current version, though I can live with the current version..
 

Miscreant

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I'm not sure what everyone is so excited about here... : / Having a flatiron floorplate does not a great project make.

There are all sorts of exciting massing typologies that could have been used here, but instead we're getting another point-tower / pancake building. And it's not going to be a pretty point tower, either. The design is incoherent and awkward to my eyes, and the precast and spandrel glass are already worrying me.

For any of the naive folks who expect this, by some miracle, to not relate closely to the cladding on 300 Front, go to the Tridel store and take a look at the model.

Yawn.

TL;DR Extruding the same floorplate over and over again is nothing to get excited about. This location deserves something special.

Yep, the possibility of a 300 Front at this important location, and with a building of this size, is very concerning.
 

Civdis

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I like 300 Front. Better than most of the green glass condos we see. Let the beatings begin!!!!!!! I'm ready :)
 

drum118

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12542662713_7a3b1f2af9_b.jpg


12543023814_31545ccf5c_b.jpg
 

rpeters

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I'm curious if there's any other cities in North America, or even the world, that have allowed their waterfronts to be walled off by slabs of privately owned concrete, and cheap glass condos. I can't think of any right off the bat. the city should probably infill some more of the harbour eventually to make an actual public space down there that's worth visiting, instead of a thin strip of commercial crap like the harbourfront, building wharves might be another option.

O and then there's the TPA, a federal gvt apparatus built to shit on Toronto.
 
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Ramako

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I'm curious if there's any other cities in North America, or even the world, that have allowed their waterfronts to be walled off by slabs of privately owned concrete.

New York, Boston, San Francisco, Seattle, Miami...

Pretty much everywhere but Chicago, which is probably why Chicago's waterfront is such a big deal.
 
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Torontovibe

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New York, Boston, San Francisco, Seattle, Miami...

Pretty much everywhere but Chicago, which is probably why Chicago's waterfront is such a big deal.

I've got news for you. Even Chicago's tall towers go right down to the waterfront. Walk to the end of E Ontario or E Grand Streets and you will see they go right down to the waterfront, just like in Toronto. I think a downtown core should go right to the waterfront, as long as there is public access at the water's edge, which Harbourfront provides. We needed to connect our downtown core to the waterfront. What's the point of leaving gaps? Harbourfront is the most crowded portion of the waterfront, so people must like it.

The PATH system will make it much easier to access in winter, so that's another huge plus.
 

Ramako

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I've got news for you. Even Chicago's tall towers go right down to the waterfront. Walk to the end of E Ontario or E Grand Streets and you will see they go right down to the waterfront, just like in Toronto. I think a downtown core should go right to the waterfront, as long as there is public access at the water's edge, which Harbourfront provides. We needed to connect our downtown core to the waterfront. What's the point of leaving gaps? Harbourfront is the most crowded portion of the waterfront, so people must like it.

The PATH system will make it much easier to access in winter, so that's another huge plus.

Personally, I agree with you. I love that lower-Manhattan/Hong Kong feel and look of massive skyscrapers sitting right on the water's edge. There's something breathtakingly metropolitan about it. Don't get me wrong, I think waterside parks are nice, but I don't need them to be right downtown.
 

Torontovibe

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We have the parks though, beside Harbour Square, along with Canada Square, Ontario Square, the sailing school area, H2O 1 & 2, not to mention Music Garden. Ten York will have lots of parks within a very short walk. (including Roundhouse Park and the new one where the Gardiner ramp is) So basically you have it all, parks north of the Gardiner, along the waterfront, PATH access and condos/retail that leads right down to Harbourfront. What more could an urbanite ask for?
http://imageshack.com/a/img835/4567/g6f8.png

This picture, by the way, is a prefect example of why I prefer Toronto's waterfront. It is all cement pathway, with some decent buildings but no retail, animation or amenities for pedestrians. It's not a very interesting walk along that large waterfront section. The only building on that stretch that even has public access, is W Hotel. (no stores, cafes, restaurants, attractions or even washroom access) Harbourfront has so much more to engage the pedestrian. (with indoor spaces like QQ Terminal, for winter use)
 
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Big Daddy

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I'm curious if there's any other cities in North America, or even the world, that have allowed their waterfronts to be walled off by slabs of privately owned concrete, and cheap glass condos. I can't think of any right off the bat. the city should probably infill some more of the harbour eventually to make an actual public space down there that's worth visiting, instead of a thin strip of commercial crap like the harbourfront, building wharves might be another option.

O and then there's the TPA, a federal gvt apparatus built to shit on Toronto.

So....what's your point?
 

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