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From The Star, on replicating the success of King Street elsewhere in town.


To me the 'Quick Wins' would be:

Don Mills from Wynford north to Sheppard. Just change the HOV to TTC only , put in bollards wherever driveways are more than 10m apart, eliminate lay-bys.

College/Carlton from Parliament to Manning. This is the wider bit of the road, you could go 'exclusive ROW' here, but you could also move to ban left turns off the street car tracks, and put barriers
preventing cars from going through/across the tracks except at intersections, and otherwise remove parking, if it blocks the remaining car lane.

Lawrence Avenue East from the DVP to Kennedy is another good stretch where taking over the curb or centre lanes for transit should be feasible, low-cost and not too disruptive.

I think Don Mills already functions well as-is.Just extend the HOV lane hours to accomodate a longer rush hour and things will be fine there.
 
I think Don Mills already functions well as-is.Just extend the HOV lane hours to accomodate a longer rush hour and things will be fine there.
For northbound peak commutes, I found myself using the 25 on it from about 2004 to 2011 ... similar as to how I had back in the 1980s - and I noticed then that despite two decades of growth, that the bus was faster than it used to be, as it no longer got stuck in traffic as much, with the bus lane! Certainly, extend the peak hours if necessary!
 
Lawrence Avenue East from the DVP to Kennedy is another good stretch where taking over the curb or centre lanes for transit should be feasible, low-cost and not too disruptive.

There are a lot of areas on Lawrence that could use queue jumping lanes (to the right of the right turn lanes) in lieu of a dedicated lanes. Both Lawrence East and West. They work quite well in suburban areas of other cities but for some reason are ignored here. What I find quite interesting is that so-called transit experts are focused on the most expensive option without looking at affordability. There is an "anti-transit" Councillor suggesting transit improvements and yet they say it's not good enough. Why doesn't the TTC implement these queue jumping lanes, he can see the improvement for his constituents and then do another step? Or is it not a large enough project sol these transit experts can receive funding to appear at EA's?
 
For northbound peak commutes, I found myself using the 25 on it from about 2004 to 2011 ... similar as to how I had back in the 1980s - and I noticed then that despite two decades of growth, that the bus was faster than it used to be, as it no longer got stuck in traffic as much, with the bus lane! Certainly, extend the peak hours if necessary!

Try it now with the Don Mills express buses. It's even faster! Theres a major pinch point at Eglinton with Crosstown construction and the DVP lane closures right now - but outside of that - its the best bus route I have used in the city.
 
Try it now with the Don Mills express buses. It's even faster!
Yeah, I just missed those, as my commute changed. Though they seem nice on the occasional off-peak trip to the Science Centre. Though Google Maps suggests it only shaves 5 minutes northbound in AM peak, but 8 minutes in PM peak. Hmm, and also that with the DVP construction (not to mention Eglinton construction on many routes), driving might now be slower than transit. Gosh!
 
Yeah, I just missed those, as my commute changed. Though they seem nice on the occasional off-peak trip to the Science Centre. Though Google Maps suggests it only shaves 5 minutes northbound in AM peak, but 8 minutes in PM peak. Hmm, and also that with the DVP construction (not to mention Eglinton construction on many routes), driving might now be slower than transit. Gosh!
Depends where you are going. I commute from Yonge/Bloor to Don Mills/Barber Green and its taken me 30 minutes with the DVP lane closures. It's still about 45-50 minutes by bus.
 
The Provincial Government will stop funding for the TTC - GO cofare. From the CP24 story doesn't mention any other GTA transit agencies. Metrolinx is apparently trying to come to an agreement to have the TTC provide the funding ?

 
The Provincial Government will stop funding for the TTC - GO cofare. From the CP24 story doesn't mention any other GTA transit agencies. Metrolinx is apparently trying to come to an agreement to have the TTC provide the funding ?


The provincial government can say that GO-RER is not dead, but if they are not building the extra stations, if they are not subsidizing/harmonizing the fares between transit modes in Toronto, they might as well kill it.
 
Wasn't this a huge deal for students who rode GO Transit buses to Highway 407 station or something as a part of their trip to and from York University?
 
The Provincial Government will stop funding for the TTC - GO cofare. From the CP24 story doesn't mention any other GTA transit agencies. Metrolinx is apparently trying to come to an agreement to have the TTC provide the funding ?

Doug Ford, for the people?:rolleyes:
 
The Provincial Government will stop funding for the TTC - GO cofare. From the CP24 story doesn't mention any other GTA transit agencies. Metrolinx is apparently trying to come to an agreement to have the TTC provide the funding ?


The co-fare for the other, suburban transit agencies comes from GO's own budget, and is still ongoing. The TTC-GO cofare required a separate budget line, and recieved only one-time funding.

Dan
 
For those who complain about surface LRT Should take a trip to Budapest to see their lines. I happen by weather to spend a day there since it was a 2 hr train ride from Vienna that was having rain and not on my list of travel points. They have traffic intersections with no turning lanes if I recall correctly. I can't speak for the whole system, other than what I saw. Roads were 2 lanes in both directions with on street parking in various areas.

A surface line beating a metro and carries 153,000 riders a day?? I saw the 52 m cars as well others that is now see 55 m
Budapest tram Line 1 reaches Kelenföld
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Since the TTC can't even analyse the data it gets now and produces useless averages that mask real problems (Steve Munro does a far better job) this is not likely to come here for a while but...

Washington, DC (CNN Business) London's subway has become the latest transportation agency to use location data collected from people's smartphones in a bid to improve services.
Transport for London, which operates the Tube, began collecting data in its stations this week, in order to determine how people are moving through the system and how crowded trains and platforms are. It said passengers will benefit as they will get more alerts about delays and congestion later this year. Extra trains could also be added on routes where the data indicates trains are especially congested.
It's become increasingly common in recent years for transportation organizations worldwide to use smartphone data to better plan services. They say digital data offers insights that greatly surpass previous methods, such as user surveys.
But transportation experts believe London may have the first public transportation system to track and use individual trip data in real time. Given how large a system London operates, other cities may follow suit if the project succeeds. The practice also raises concerns about user privacy, unwanted tracking, potential hacks and the misuse of data.

See: https://www.cnn.com/2019/07/12/tech/london-subway-tracking/index.html

Actually a very interesting article about how proper transit analysis can vastly improve transit - what a surprise!
 

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