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Northern Light

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Very cool! Could that be the same large tree in both pictures?

Looks to be the same tree to me.

54 years since the first pic; by my best guess, 30 years old in the first pic. (clearly stands well over 35ft tall)

So over 80 now.
 

raygo

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Yes, Glen Castle is the street just east of JRR, and no, they haven't changed the name of the school. I was just looking at Glen Castle on Google streetview - and there is a house with a turret - but not the same one.


There are pictures at the archives of 54 and 62 Glenview dated 1950/51 – that are probably the houses on the south side that were taken out when Duplex was extended.



I was there on Thursday.:eek: There's a 50’s bungalow that could be located where that house was – but I don’t see any turreted house anywhere on the 1910 Goad map. I haven’t walked the dog to Alexander Muir Park since the fall and I can’t recall what the view from the valley looks like – if it was Glengrove east that would be the approximate area from which the photo was taken. According to a 1931 topographic map, Glengrove east went down the hill, over the brook, and joined up with Glengowan.

There is also this photo that appears to have been taken around the same place. If it's Glengrove east I can see why it's now a dead end. The photo description says - See also Fonds 1244, Item 7030 for later picture – which is our picture of the flapper & the trees on Glengrove west.

f1244_it7301.jpg


I don’t think it is the Blythwood Rd bridge.

f1231_it1529.jpg
Anna................I am doing a history project on 97 Glengrove Ave. West and want to re-examine your earlier discussion about the mystery turreted home "near Glengrove Ave.". I agree with Mustapha that it is definitely not Ansley Castle, since it did not have a similar turret and the ravine slope, while possible, is not certain. Some discussion existed about whether it may have been James Beaty's original stone home from 1855? It was torn down to make room for Ansley Castle in 1909. It was named Pindar's Farm before 1909 and was located in the same area where Ansley was eventually built. So this is a possible explanation. no picture exists of the Beaty residence, but it can be located to the same property area. Was this issue ever resolved? I would like to be certain as I have been asked to give a talk on the subject. Much thanks in advance. Ray
 

raygo

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Hi seemsartless,

This isn't "Glen Castle", what it might be I can't be sure. There was an "Ansley Castle" at the corner of what is now Glengrove and Heather, on top of the low hill just east of the present day John Ross Robertson School.

If you can find a copy of Don Ritchie's "North Toronto" (Stoddart 1992) or a copy of "North Toronto in Pictures" (Toronto Public Library Local History Handbooks 1974). there are pictures of Ansley Castle. Time prevents making scans this evening.

From "North Toronto" page 88: "...the 'castle' had been built for Alfred Ansley, a successful manufacturer of hats..."

From "North Toronto in Pictures" page 19: "...the Ansleys built a substantial house of Portland cement at Heather street in 1909. When demolished in the early 1920s, the neighbours took pieces of it as souvenirs and used it for rockery in their gardens."

More on Glen Grove Park from "North Toronto in Pictures" page 19: "Pilgrims Farm [the name for the area before it became Glen Grove Park] was settled around the time of the War of 1812. James Beatty, a later owner, made it an 'occasional summer retreat' and renamed it 'Glen Grove'. Glen Grove Park was a popular place for Sunday School picnics and church garden parties in the 1890s.The open fields near Yonge street were used as a race course, a baseball diamond, an a cricket field."

I agree with your guess that your picture scene might be on the east side of Yonge - Blythwood Ravine. I could be wrong but I haven't been on Glengrove Avenue east in decades; it's a short no-exit street and I have no reason to be there but I don't think there is an extant house like that.

You have a nice website by the by. :)
Mustapha................I am doing a history project on 97 Glengrove Ave. West and want to re-examine your earlier discussion about the mystery turreted home "near Glengrove Ave.". I agree with Mustapha that it is definitely not Ansley Castle, since it did not have a similar turret and the ravine slope, while possible, is not certain. Some discussion existed about whether it may have been James Beaty's original stone home from 1855? It was torn down to make room for Ansley Castle in 1909. It was named Pindar's Farm before 1909 and was located in the same area where Ansley was eventually built. So this is a possible explanation. no picture exists of the Beaty residence, but it can be located to the same property area. Was this issue ever resolved? I would like to be certain as I have been asked to give a talk on the subject. Much thanks in advance. Ray
 

Jarvisonian

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OK here's a challenge for all you Jarvis St afficianados ... The Blake House ...

... would anyone have early pictures of the Blake House at 449 Jarvis St. I've looked everywhere! I can't believe a house of this historical significance was not photographed many times once completed in 1891(?).
Thanks,
Stephen MacDonald

Then. 266 Jarvis Street. c1907. Victor Home for Young Women. Another wwwebster sourced picture.

230266Jarvisc1907.jpg



Now. April 2011.

231.jpg
[/QUOTE]
I've just emailed you pics of dozens of slides, negatives and prints of this house that the Toronto Archives have from the 1970s through the 2000s. Unfortunately they don't seem to have anything earlier than this.
 

LPCI

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I've just emailed you pics of dozens of slides, negatives and prints of this house that the Toronto Archives have from the 1970s through the 2000s. Unfortunately they don't seem to have anything earlier than this.
[/QUOTE]
Another three that somehow has survived, it looks like the same tree to me.👍
 

thecharioteer

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Northern Light

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Let's not forget that after the demolition of the old Parliament Buildings in the early 1900's the whole block became a freight yard and sheds for the Grand Trunk Railway (and then a parking lot):

1910:

View attachment 296902

View attachment 296903View attachment 296904

Trains were still crossing Front Street at the Spadina Bridge on their way to that yard when I was a kid:


** note, not my photo, I'm not sure where I got it. I reverse image searched via Google and Tin-Eye w/o luck.
 

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